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Open AccessArticle

Athlete Self-Report Measure Use and Associated Psychological Alterations

1
Centre for Sport Research (CSR), Deakin University, Geelong 3220, Australia
2
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), Deakin University, Geelong 3220, Australia
3
Institute of Sport, Exercise and Active Living (ISEAL), Victoria University, Melbourne 8001, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2017, 5(3), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports5030054
Received: 30 June 2017 / Revised: 20 July 2017 / Accepted: 21 July 2017 / Published: 26 July 2017
The experience of athletes and practitioners has led to the suggestion that use of an athlete self-report measure (ASRM) may increase an athlete’s self-awareness, satisfaction, motivation, and confidence. This study sought to provide empirical evidence for this assertion by evaluating psychological alterations associated with ASRM use across a diverse athlete population. Athletes (n = 335) had access to an ASRM for 16 weeks and completed an online survey at baseline, and weeks 4, 8, and 16. Generalized estimating equations were used to evaluate the associations between ASRM compliance and outcome measures. Compared to baseline, confidence and extrinsic motivation were most likely increased at weeks 4, 8, and 16. Satisfaction and intrinsic motivation were most likely decreased at week 4, but no different to baseline values at weeks 8 and 16. Novice athletes and those who were instructed to use an ASRM (rather than using one autonomously) were less responsive to ASRM use. This study provides preliminary evidence for ASRM to prompt initial dissatisfaction and decreased intrinsic motivation which, along with increased confidence and extrinsic motivation, may provide the necessary stimulus to improve performance-related behaviors. Novice and less autonomous athletes may benefit from support to develop motivation, knowledge, and skills to use the information gleaned from an ASRM effectively. View Full-Text
Keywords: confidence; motivation; satisfaction; self-awareness; self-regulation; monitoring confidence; motivation; satisfaction; self-awareness; self-regulation; monitoring
MDPI and ACS Style

Saw, A.E.; Main, L.C.; Robertson, S.; Gastin, P.B. Athlete Self-Report Measure Use and Associated Psychological Alterations. Sports 2017, 5, 54.

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