Next Article in Journal
Behavioral Response of Leptoglossus zonatus (Heteroptera: Coreidae) to Stimuli Based on Colors and its Aggregation Pheromone
Next Article in Special Issue
Distribution of Canthon rutilans rutilans and Canthon rutilans cyanescens Along Spatio-Temporal and Temperature Gradients
Previous Article in Journal
Alterations and Interchange of Morphometric Characters in Different Life Cycle Stages with Reference to Genomic Variations of Anopheles subpictus (Diptera; Culicidae) Sibling Species Complex in Sri Lanka
Previous Article in Special Issue
Continued Susceptibility of the wMel Wolbachia Infection in Aedes aegypti to Heat Stress Following Field Deployment and Selection
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Temperature Acclimation Ability by an Oceanic Sea Skater, Halobatesgermanus, Inhabiting the Tropical Pacific Ocean

1
Laboratory of Environmental Physiology, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520, Japan
2
Laboratory of Science Education, Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2018, 9(3), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects9030090
Received: 22 March 2018 / Revised: 28 June 2018 / Accepted: 29 June 2018 / Published: 24 July 2018
  |  
PDF [753 KB, uploaded 24 July 2018]
  |  

Abstract

Temperature acclimation and heat shock experiments were performed on adult oceanic skaters, Halobates germanus, inhabiting the tropical Pacific Ocean. Acclimation for 10 or 24 h to 25 °C or 28 °C promoted significantly lower cool coma temperatures by specimens than acclimation to 31 °C. After heat shock by exposure to the relatively moderate temperature of 32.5 °C for 12 h, 52.9% or 61.1%% of specimens died in the 24 h period following acclimation at 28 °C or 31 °C, respectively, whereas all survived when there was no experience of heat shock. The average cool coma temperature was 14 to 17 °C in the specimens which had suffered no heat shock, whereas it was much higher (22 to 23 °C) in specimens that had suffered heat shock. The lower survival rate and the higher cool coma temperature can be attributed to damage suffered by exposure to 32.5 °C. The upper limit of the surface water temperature in the tropical ocean (15° N to 15° S) is currently around 30 to 31 °C, and Halobates appear to have no experience in 32 to 33 °C environments. Nevertheless, 32 °C, i.e., a temperaturethat is only slightly higher than 30 to 31 °C, may occur in the future due to global warming. This species may develop resistance to 32 to 33 °C in the near future. View Full-Text
Keywords: Heteroptera; oceanic sea skaters; Halobates germanus; temperature acclimation; cool hardiness; global warming Heteroptera; oceanic sea skaters; Halobates germanus; temperature acclimation; cool hardiness; global warming
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Furuki, T.; Fujita, H.; Nakajo, M.; Harada, T. Temperature Acclimation Ability by an Oceanic Sea Skater, Halobatesgermanus, Inhabiting the Tropical Pacific Ocean. Insects 2018, 9, 90.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Insects EISSN 2075-4450 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top