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Article

A DNA Barcoding Survey of an Arctic Arthropod Community: Implications for Future Monitoring

1
Centre for Biodiversity Genomics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1, Canada
2
Canadian High Arctic Research Station, Polar Knowledge Canada, 1 Uvajuq Road, Cambridge Bay, NU X0B 0C0, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2020, 11(1), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11010046
Received: 2 December 2019 / Revised: 20 December 2019 / Accepted: 6 January 2020 / Published: 9 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polar Entomology)
Accurate and cost-effective methods for tracking changes in arthropod communities are needed to develop integrative environmental monitoring programs in the Arctic. To date, even baseline data on their species composition at established ecological monitoring sites are severely lacking. We present the results of a pilot assessment of non-marine arthropod diversity in a middle arctic tundra area near Ikaluktutiak (Cambridge Bay), Victoria Island, Nunavut, undertaken in 2018 using DNA barcodes. A total of 1264 Barcode Index Number (BIN) clusters, used as a proxy for species, were recorded. The efficacy of widely used sampling methods was assessed. Yellow pan traps captured 62% of the entire BIN diversity at the study sites. When complemented with soil and leaf litter sifting, the coverage rose up to 74.6%. Combining community-based data collection with high-throughput DNA barcoding has the potential to overcome many of the logistic, financial, and taxonomic obstacles for large-scale monitoring of the Arctic arthropod fauna. View Full-Text
Keywords: molecular biodiversity; Insecta; Arachnida; Collembola; Arthropoda; community-based monitoring; tundra molecular biodiversity; Insecta; Arachnida; Collembola; Arthropoda; community-based monitoring; tundra
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pentinsaari, M.; Blagoev, G.A.; Hogg, I.D.; Levesque-Beaudin, V.; Perez, K.; Sobel, C.N.; Vandenbrink, B.; Borisenko, A. A DNA Barcoding Survey of an Arctic Arthropod Community: Implications for Future Monitoring. Insects 2020, 11, 46. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11010046

AMA Style

Pentinsaari M, Blagoev GA, Hogg ID, Levesque-Beaudin V, Perez K, Sobel CN, Vandenbrink B, Borisenko A. A DNA Barcoding Survey of an Arctic Arthropod Community: Implications for Future Monitoring. Insects. 2020; 11(1):46. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11010046

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pentinsaari, Mikko, Gergin A. Blagoev, Ian D. Hogg, Valerie Levesque-Beaudin, Kate Perez, Crystal N. Sobel, Bryan Vandenbrink, and Alex Borisenko. 2020. "A DNA Barcoding Survey of an Arctic Arthropod Community: Implications for Future Monitoring" Insects 11, no. 1: 46. https://doi.org/10.3390/insects11010046

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