Next Article in Journal
Creating the Urban Farmer’s Almanac with Citizen Science Data
Next Article in Special Issue
Generalism in Nature…The Great Misnomer: Aphids and Wasp Parasitoids as Examples
Previous Article in Journal
Twenty-five Years of Research Experience with the Sterile Insect Technique and Area-Wide Management of Codling Moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), in Canada
Previous Article in Special Issue
Neo Sex Chromosomes, Colour Polymorphism and Male-Killing in the African Queen Butterfly, Danaus chrysippus (L.)
Open AccessArticle

Variation in Performance and Resistance to Parasitism of Plutella xylostella Populations

1
Laboratory of Entomology, Wageningen University & Research, Droevendaalsesteeg 1, 6708 PB Wageningen, The Netherlands
2
EBCL USDA ARS, 810 Avenue du Campus Agropolis, 34980 Montferrier-sur-Lez, France
3
Department of Terrestrial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, Droevendaalsesteeg 10, 6708 PB Wageningen, The Netherlands
4
Department of Ecological Science, Section Animal Ecology, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2019, 10(9), 293; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10090293
Received: 2 August 2019 / Revised: 29 August 2019 / Accepted: 30 August 2019 / Published: 11 September 2019
Two major ecological factors determine the fitness of an insect herbivore: the ability to overcome plant resistance strategies (bottom-up effects) and the ability to avoid or resist attack by natural enemies such as predators and parasitoids (top-down effects). In response to differences in selection pressure, variation may exist in host-plant adaptation and immunity against parasitism among populations of an insect herbivore. We investigated the variation in larval performance of six different Plutella xylostella populations originating from four continents when feeding on a native Dutch plant species, Brassica rapa. One of the used populations has successfully switched its host plant, and is now adapted to pea. In addition, we determined the resistance to attack by the endoparasitoid Diadegma semiclausum originating from the Netherlands (where it is also native) and measured parasitoid performance as a proxy for host resistance against parasitism. Pupal mortality, immature development times, and adult biomass of P. xylostella differed significantly across populations when feeding on the same host plant species. In addition, parasitism success differed in terms of parasitoid adult emergence and their biomass, but not their development times. Variation among natural populations of insects should be considered more when studying interactions between plants and insects up the food chain. View Full-Text
Keywords: diamondback moth; insect-herbivore interactions; genetic variation; host-plant adaptation; host immunity; parasitoid; plant resistance diamondback moth; insect-herbivore interactions; genetic variation; host-plant adaptation; host immunity; parasitoid; plant resistance
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Gols, R.; Desurmont, G.A.; Harvey, J.A. Variation in Performance and Resistance to Parasitism of Plutella xylostella Populations. Insects 2019, 10, 293.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop