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Abundance and Population Decline Factors of Chrysopid Juveniles in Olive Groves and Adjacent Trees

1
Plant Protection Group, Department of Environmental Protection, Estación Experimental del Zaidín (EEZ-CSIC), C/Profesor Albareda 1, 18008 Granada, Spain
2
Department of Zoology, University of Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva s/n, 18071 Granada, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2019, 10(5), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10050134
Received: 5 March 2019 / Revised: 24 April 2019 / Accepted: 1 May 2019 / Published: 7 May 2019
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Abstract

Numerous species of the family Chrysopidae, commonly found in agroecosystems, whose larvae predate on several pests of economic importance, are regarded as biological control agents. Their abundance and diversity are influenced by vegetation cover, although little is known about the effects of semi-natural habitats on their populations. The objective of this study is to gain a better understanding of the relationship between the trees in semi-natural habitats adjacent to olive groves, juvenile stages of the family Chrysopidae and factors influencing their population decline, which is crucial for an effective habitat management program aimed at conserving these important predators. Using cardboard band traps (eight per tree), the juvenile stages were collected from 25 almond, oak, olive and pine trees over a one-year sampling period. The population decline was caused by parasitoids (26.5%), predators (5.1%) and unknown factors (13.2%). In addition, chrysopids established in olive trees showed the lowest rate of parasitism. We identified ten chrysopid species that emerged from the juveniles collected from almond, oak, olive and pine trees, with a predominance of Pseudomallada prasinus. The chrysopid–parasitoid complex was composed of five species; Baryscapus impeditus (Eulophidae), which was the most abundant, was preferentially associated with Chrysopa pallens, Chrysoperla lucasina and Chrysoperla mediterranea. View Full-Text
Keywords: parasitoids; Chrysoperla carnea complex; ecological infrastructure; Olea europaea; Pinus halepensis; Prunus dulcis; Quercus rotundifolia parasitoids; Chrysoperla carnea complex; ecological infrastructure; Olea europaea; Pinus halepensis; Prunus dulcis; Quercus rotundifolia
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Herrera, R.A.; Campos, M.; González-Salvadó, M.; Ruano, F. Abundance and Population Decline Factors of Chrysopid Juveniles in Olive Groves and Adjacent Trees. Insects 2019, 10, 134.

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