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Population Dynamics of Six Major Insect Pests During Multiple Crop Growing Seasons in Northwestern New Mexico

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Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Agricultural Science Center at Farmington, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 1018, Farmington, NM 87499, USA
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Higgins Farms Inc., 4220 N. Crescent Ave, Farmington, NM 87401, USA
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Wilbur-Ellis Co., 9813 NM-Hwy 371, PO Box 5370, Farmington, NM 87401, USA
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ADA Consulting Africa, 07 BP 14284, Lomé, Togo
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2019, 10(11), 369; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10110369
Received: 11 September 2019 / Revised: 17 October 2019 / Accepted: 21 October 2019 / Published: 24 October 2019
This study was conducted to monitor the population dynamics of six major insect pests at the NMSU Agricultural Science Center at Farmington (ASC-Farmington) and within an adjacent commercial farm (Navajo Agricultural Products Industry, NAPI) for more effective and efficient pest management during the 2013–2019 period. Specific pheromone traps, sticky and net traps were used to collects moths of beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua), cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni), corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea), fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda), potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli), and western bean cutworm (Striacosta albicosta). These insects generally appear in early June and their population decreases toward the end of August/early September with different peak times and magnitudes during July and August. Bactericera cockerelli was not substantially present in the commercial farm due to intensive insecticide application. Overall, all six insect species were present at ASC-Farmington, with relative abundance, in percent of the total collected moths by all traps, varying from 6.5 to 19% for Trichoplusia ni, 16 to 29.2% for Spodoptera exigua, 1.5 to 20.6% for Striacosta albicosta, 10 to 25% for Helicoverpa zea, 18.5 to 25.6% for Spodoptera frugiperda and 8.5 to 26.9% for Bactericera cockerelli. In NAPI’s commercial field, while the potato psyllid Bactericera cockerelli was not recorded, Trichoplusia ni and Spodoptera exigua showed decreasing rates that varied from 27.5 to 4.2% and from 49.3 to 7.8%, respectively. Striacosta albicosta, Helicoverpa zea and Spodoptera exigua showed increasing rates varying from 2.9 to 28%, from 7.8 to 25.3% and from 10.9 to 52%, respectively. The results of this study could serve as a guideline for sustainable management strategies for each of the six species for production profitability. View Full-Text
Keywords: fall armyworm; cabbage looper; corn earworm; beet armyworm; potato psyllid; western bean cutworm; seasonal abundance fall armyworm; cabbage looper; corn earworm; beet armyworm; potato psyllid; western bean cutworm; seasonal abundance
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MDPI and ACS Style

Djaman, K.; Higgins, C.; O’Neill, M.; Begay, S.; Koudahe, K.; Allen, S. Population Dynamics of Six Major Insect Pests During Multiple Crop Growing Seasons in Northwestern New Mexico. Insects 2019, 10, 369.

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