Next Article in Journal
Neuroethology of the Waggle Dance: How Followers Interact with the Waggle Dancer and Detect Spatial Information
Next Article in Special Issue
Advances and Challenges of Using the Sterile Insect Technique for the Management of Pest Lepidoptera
Previous Article in Journal
Effects of Insecticide Stress on Expression of NlABCG Transporter Gene in the Brown Planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens
Open AccessArticle

Peri-Urban Community Attitudes towards Codling Moth Trapping and Suppression Using the Sterile Insect Technique in New Zealand

1
School of Environment, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010, New Zealand
2
The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, Havelock North 4157, New Zealand
3
The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, Private Bag 4704, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand
4
School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland 1072, New Zealand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2019, 10(10), 335; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10100335
Received: 7 August 2019 / Revised: 25 September 2019 / Accepted: 30 September 2019 / Published: 9 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) and Its Applications)
New, more socially-acceptable technologies are being developed to suppress horticultural pests, because suppression is technically difficult with current technologies, especially in urban areas. One technique involves the release of sterile insects to prevent offspring in the next generation. This technology involves aerial or ground release systems, but this could also create issues for the public. This study investigated community perceptions of a recently-introduced response to codling moth control in New Zealand—Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). Community attitudes to SIT were examined in Hastings, New Zealand, in April, 2018. Eighty-six detailed interviews were undertaken with a random sample of households. This community was very willing (98% agreement) to host a sex pheromone trap in their gardens, and condoned regular visits to monitor traps. Attitudes to SIT were very positive (98% in favor). Once explained, the concept of using unmanned aerial vehicles to deliver sterile insects was also acceptable (98%) to the community. Use of unmanned aerial vehicles to release sterile insects during a hypothetical incursion response of an exotic fruit fly was also supported at 98% by respondent householders. Investigation of community attitudes can be valuable to guide practitioners in determining suitable technologies before an area-wide programme is launched. View Full-Text
Keywords: eradication; public; biosecurity; Cydia pomonella; unmanned aerial vehicle eradication; public; biosecurity; Cydia pomonella; unmanned aerial vehicle
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Paterson, G.; Perry, G.L.W.; Walker, J.T.S.; Suckling, D.M. Peri-Urban Community Attitudes towards Codling Moth Trapping and Suppression Using the Sterile Insect Technique in New Zealand. Insects 2019, 10, 335.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop