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Dark Matter Dogma: A Study of 214 Galaxies

1
Independent Researcher, London NW8, UK
2
Independent Researcher, Glenview, IL 60025, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Galaxies 2020, 8(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/galaxies8020036
Received: 25 February 2020 / Revised: 8 April 2020 / Accepted: 21 April 2020 / Published: 28 April 2020
The aim of this paper is to test the need for non-baryonic dark matter in the context of galactic rotation and the apparent difference between distributions of galactic mass and luminosity. We present a set of rotation curves and 3.6 μm surface brightness profiles for a diverse sample of 214 galaxies. Using rotation curves as the sole input into our Newtonian disk model, we compute non-parametric radial profiles of surface mass density. All profiles exhibit lower density than parametric models with dark halos and provide a superior fit with observed rotation curves. Assuming all dynamical mass is in main-sequence stars, we estimate radial distributions of characteristic star mass implied by the corresponding pairs of density and brightness profiles. We find that for 132 galaxies or 62% of the sample, the relation between density and brightness can be fully explained by a radially declining stellar mass gradient. Such idealized stellar population fitting can also largely address density and brightness distributions of the remaining 82 galaxies, but their periphery shows, on average, 14 M/pc2 difference between total density and light-constrained stellar density. We discuss how this density gap can be interpreted, by considering a low-luminosity baryonic matter, observational uncertainties, and visibility cutoffs for red dwarf populations. Lastly, we report tight correlation between radial density and brightness trends, and the discovered flattening of surface brightness profiles—both being evidence against dark matter. Our findings make non-baryonic dark matter unnecessary in the context of galactic rotation. View Full-Text
Keywords: galaxy; rotation curve; Newtonian dynamics; galaxy mass model; surface mass density; surface brightness; mass–luminosity; radial star mass profile; dark matter galaxy; rotation curve; Newtonian dynamics; galaxy mass model; surface mass density; surface brightness; mass–luminosity; radial star mass profile; dark matter
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Sipols, A.; Pavlovich, A. Dark Matter Dogma: A Study of 214 Galaxies. Galaxies 2020, 8, 36.

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