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Article

Role of Lung Ultrasound in Predicting Clinical Severity and Fatality in COVID-19 Pneumonia

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Department of Pulmology, University Hospital of Split, 21000 Split, Croatia
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Department of Infectious Diseases, University Hospital of Split, 21000 Split, Croatia
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Department of Surgery, University Hospital of Split, 21000 Split, Croatia
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Department of Internal Emergency Medicine, University Hospital of Split, 21000 Split, Croatia
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Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Split, 21000 Split, Croatia
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School of Medicine, University of Split, 21000 Split, Croatia
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Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Centre of Excellence for Systemic Sclerosis in Croatia, University Hospital of Split, 21000 Split, Croatia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jan Philipp Radtke
J. Pers. Med. 2021, 11(8), 757; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11080757
Received: 3 June 2021 / Revised: 24 July 2021 / Accepted: 29 July 2021 / Published: 30 July 2021
Background: Lung ultrasound (LUS) is a useful imaging method for identifying COVID-19 pneumonia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of LUS in predicting the severity of the disease and fatality in patients with COVID-19. Methods: This was a single-center, follow-up study, conducted from 1 November 2020, to 22 March 2021. The LUS protocol was based on the assessment of 14 lung zones with a total score up to 42, which was compared to the disease severity and fatality. Results: A total of 133 patients with COVID-19 pneumonia confirmed by RT-PCR were enrolled, with a median time from hospital admission to lung ultrasound of one day. The LUS score was correlated with clinical severity at hospital admission (Spearman’s rho 0.40, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.53, p < 0.001). Patients with higher LUS scores were experiencing greater disease severity; a high flow nasal cannula had an odds ratio of 1.43 (5% CI 1.17–1.74) in patients with LUS score > 29; the same score also predicted the need for mechanical ventilation (1.25, [1.07–1.48]). An LUS score > 30 (1.41 [1.18–1.68]) and age over 68 (1.26 [1.11–1.43]) were significant predictors of fatality. Conclusions: LUS at hospital admission is shown to have a high predictive power of the severity and fatality of COVID-19 pneumonia. View Full-Text
Keywords: lung ultrasound; LUS; COVID-19; prognostic; pneumonia lung ultrasound; LUS; COVID-19; prognostic; pneumonia
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MDPI and ACS Style

Skopljanac, I.; Ivelja, M.P.; Barcot, O.; Brdar, I.; Dolic, K.; Polasek, O.; Radic, M. Role of Lung Ultrasound in Predicting Clinical Severity and Fatality in COVID-19 Pneumonia. J. Pers. Med. 2021, 11, 757. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11080757

AMA Style

Skopljanac I, Ivelja MP, Barcot O, Brdar I, Dolic K, Polasek O, Radic M. Role of Lung Ultrasound in Predicting Clinical Severity and Fatality in COVID-19 Pneumonia. Journal of Personalized Medicine. 2021; 11(8):757. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11080757

Chicago/Turabian Style

Skopljanac, Ivan, Mirela Pavicic Ivelja, Ognjen Barcot, Ivan Brdar, Kresimir Dolic, Ozren Polasek, and Mislav Radic. 2021. "Role of Lung Ultrasound in Predicting Clinical Severity and Fatality in COVID-19 Pneumonia" Journal of Personalized Medicine 11, no. 8: 757. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11080757

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