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Article

Customization of Diet May Promote Exercise and Improve Mental Wellbeing in Mature Adults: The Role of Exercise as a Mediator

1
Health and Wellness Studies Department, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY 13890, USA
2
Department of Psychology, Integrative Neuroscience, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY 13890, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Yvonne T. van der Schouw and Diederick E. Grobbee
J. Pers. Med. 2021, 11(5), 435; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11050435
Received: 8 April 2021 / Revised: 13 May 2021 / Accepted: 17 May 2021 / Published: 19 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Therapy, Personalized Nutrition, and Chronic Disease)
Diet, dietary practices and exercise are modifiable risk factors for individuals living with mental distress. However, these relationships are intricate and multilayered in such a way that individual factors may influence mental health differently when combined within a pattern. Additionally, two important factors that need to be considered are gender and level of brain maturity. Therefore, it is essential to assess these modifiable risk factors based on gender and age group. The purpose of the study was to explore the combined and individual relationships between food groups, dietary practices and exercise to appreciate their association with mental distress in mature men and women. Adults 30 years and older were invited to complete the food–mood questionnaire. The anonymous questionnaire link was circulated on several social media platforms. A multi-analyses approach was used. A combination of data mining techniques, namely, a mediation regression analysis, the K-means clustering and principal component analysis as well as Spearman’s rank–order correlation were used to explore these research questions. The results suggest that women’s mental health has a higher association with dietary factors than men. Mental distress and exercise frequency were associated with different dietary and lifestyle patterns, which support the concept of customizing diet and lifestyle factors to improve mental wellbeing. View Full-Text
Keywords: diet; dietary practices; mental health; exercise; customization; gender; adults; brain maturity diet; dietary practices; mental health; exercise; customization; gender; adults; brain maturity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Begdache, L.; Patrissy, C.M. Customization of Diet May Promote Exercise and Improve Mental Wellbeing in Mature Adults: The Role of Exercise as a Mediator. J. Pers. Med. 2021, 11, 435. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11050435

AMA Style

Begdache L, Patrissy CM. Customization of Diet May Promote Exercise and Improve Mental Wellbeing in Mature Adults: The Role of Exercise as a Mediator. Journal of Personalized Medicine. 2021; 11(5):435. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11050435

Chicago/Turabian Style

Begdache, Lina, and Cara M. Patrissy. 2021. "Customization of Diet May Promote Exercise and Improve Mental Wellbeing in Mature Adults: The Role of Exercise as a Mediator" Journal of Personalized Medicine 11, no. 5: 435. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11050435

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