Next Article in Journal
A Predictive Model and Risk Factors for Case Fatality of COVID-19
Next Article in Special Issue
Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients: A Systematic Review
Previous Article in Journal
A Whole-Genome Sequencing Association Study of Low Bone Mineral Density Identifies New Susceptibility Loci in the Phase I Qatar Biobank Cohort
Previous Article in Special Issue
Differential Microbial Pattern Description in Subjects with Autoimmune-Based Thyroid Diseases: A Pilot Study
Article

Altered Gut Microbiota in Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Its Association with Food Components

1
School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA
2
School of Nursing, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
3
Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
4
Microbial Analysis, Resources, and Services (MARS), University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA
5
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Connecticut, Farmington, CT 06106, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Pers. Med. 2021, 11(1), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11010035
Received: 5 November 2020 / Revised: 18 December 2020 / Accepted: 4 January 2021 / Published: 8 January 2021
The interplay between diet and gut microbiota has gained interest as a potential contributor in pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The purpose of this study was to compare food components and gut microbiota patterns between IBS patients and healthy controls (HC) as well as to explore the associations of food components and microbiota profiles. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 80 young adults with IBS and 21 HC recruited. The food frequency questionnaire was used to measure food components. Fecal samples were collected and profiled by 16S rRNA Illumina sequencing. Food components were similar in both IBS and HC groups, except in caffeine consumption. Higher alpha diversity indices and altered gut microbiota were observed in IBS compared to the HC. A negative correlation existed between total observed species and caffeine intake in the HC, and a positive correlation between alpha diversity indices and dietary fiber in the IBS group. Higher alpha diversity and gut microbiota alteration were found in IBS people who consumed caffeine more than 400 mg/d. Moreover, high microbial diversity and alteration of gut microbiota composition in IBS people with high caffeine consumption may be a clue toward the effects of caffeine on the gut microbiome pattern, which warrants further study. View Full-Text
Keywords: irritable bowel syndrome; microbiota; microbiome; food components; nutrients irritable bowel syndrome; microbiota; microbiome; food components; nutrients
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Barandouzi, Z.A.; Lee, J.; Maas, K.; Starkweather, A.R.; Cong, X.S. Altered Gut Microbiota in Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Its Association with Food Components. J. Pers. Med. 2021, 11, 35. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11010035

AMA Style

Barandouzi ZA, Lee J, Maas K, Starkweather AR, Cong XS. Altered Gut Microbiota in Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Its Association with Food Components. Journal of Personalized Medicine. 2021; 11(1):35. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11010035

Chicago/Turabian Style

Barandouzi, Zahra A., Joochul Lee, Kendra Maas, Angela R. Starkweather, and Xiaomei S. Cong 2021. "Altered Gut Microbiota in Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Its Association with Food Components" Journal of Personalized Medicine 11, no. 1: 35. https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm11010035

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop