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Article

Shoulder Isokinetic Strength Deficit in Patients with Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

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CHU Nantes, Service de Médecine Physique et Réadaptation Locomotrice et Respiratoire, 44093 Nantes, France
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CHU Nantes, Service de Médecine du Sport, 44093 Nantes, France
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Institut Européen de la Main, 2540 Luxembourg, Luxembourg
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Medical Training Center, Hopital Kirchberg, 2540 Luxembourg, Luxembourg
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Inserm, UMR 1229, RMeS, Regenerative Medicine and Skeleton, Université de Nantes, ONIRIS, 44042 Nantes, France
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IRMS, Institut Régional de Médecine du Sport, 44093 Nantes, France
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CHU Nantes, Clinique Chirurgicale Orthopédique et Traumatologique, 44093 Nantes, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Chao-Min Cheng
Diagnostics 2021, 11(9), 1529; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11091529
Received: 25 July 2021 / Revised: 16 August 2021 / Accepted: 23 August 2021 / Published: 24 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Point-of-Care Diagnostics and Devices)
Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) is an impairing painful condition. Patients usually report upper-limb pain, weakness and paresthesia. Shoulder weakness is frequently reported but has never been described with objective strength evaluation. We aimed to compare isokinetic shoulder strength between patients with NTOS and healthy controls. Patients and controls were prospectively evaluated with an isokinetic strength test at 60 and 180°/s, and an endurance test (30 repetitions at 180°/s) of the shoulder rotators. Patients were functionally assessed with QuickDASH questionnaires. One hundred patients and one hundred healthy subjects were included. Seventy-one percent of patients with NTOS were females with a mean age of 39.4 ± 9.6. They were compared to controls, 73% females and the mean age of 38.8 ± 9.8. Patients’ mean QuickDASH was 58.3 ± 13.9. Concerning the peak of strength at 60°/s, the symptomatic limbs of patients with NTOS had significantly 21% and 29% less strength than the control limbs for medial and lateral rotators, respectively (p ≤ 0.001). At 180°/s, the symptomatic limbs had significantly 23% and 20% less strength than the controls for medial and lateral rotators, respectively (p ≤ 0.001). The symptomatic limbs had significantly 45% and 30% less endurance than the controls for medial and lateral rotators, respectively (p ≤ 0.001). These deficits were correlated to the QuickDASH. Patients with NTOS presented a significant deficit of strength and endurance of the shoulder rotators correlated to disability. This highlights the interest in upper-limb strength evaluation in the diagnostic process and the follow-up of NTOS. View Full-Text
Keywords: neurogenic; thoracic outlet syndrome; strength; endurance; isokinetic; QuickDASH neurogenic; thoracic outlet syndrome; strength; endurance; isokinetic; QuickDASH
MDPI and ACS Style

Daley, P.; Pomares, G.; Menu, P.; Gadbled, G.; Dauty, M.; Fouasson-Chailloux, A. Shoulder Isokinetic Strength Deficit in Patients with Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. Diagnostics 2021, 11, 1529. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11091529

AMA Style

Daley P, Pomares G, Menu P, Gadbled G, Dauty M, Fouasson-Chailloux A. Shoulder Isokinetic Strength Deficit in Patients with Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. Diagnostics. 2021; 11(9):1529. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11091529

Chicago/Turabian Style

Daley, Pauline, Germain Pomares, Pierre Menu, Guillaume Gadbled, Marc Dauty, and Alban Fouasson-Chailloux. 2021. "Shoulder Isokinetic Strength Deficit in Patients with Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome" Diagnostics 11, no. 9: 1529. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11091529

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