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Socioeconomic Status and Ovarian Cancer Stage at Diagnosis: A Study Nested Within UKCTOCS
Article

Transmission of X-linked Ovarian Cancer: Characterization and Implications

1
Department of Cancer Prevention and Control, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA
2
Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA
3
Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA
4
Department of Cancer Genetics and Genomics, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA
5
Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA
6
Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY 14263, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diagnostics 2020, 10(2), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10020090
Received: 15 January 2020 / Revised: 3 February 2020 / Accepted: 5 February 2020 / Published: 7 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ovarian Cancer: Characteristics, Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment)
We recently reported evidence that a strong, BRCA-independent locus on the X-chromosome may contribute to ovarian cancer predisposition in families ascertained from the Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry (Buffalo, NY, USA). While it has been estimated that approximately 20% of all ovarian cancer cases are hereditary, it is possible that a significant proportion of cases previously believed to be sporadic may, in fact, be X-linked. Such X-linked disease has a distinct pattern; it implies that a father will necessarily pass a risk allele to each of his daughters, increasing the prevalence of cancers clustered within a family. X-chromosome inactivation further influences the expression of X-linked alleles and may represent a novel target for screening and therapy. Herein, we review the current literature regarding X-linked ovarian cancer and interpret allele transmission-based models to characterize X-linked ovarian cancer and develop a framework for clinical and epidemiological familial ascertainment to inform the design of future studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: ovarian cancer; hereditary cancer; familial cancer; X-linked disease ovarian cancer; hereditary cancer; familial cancer; X-linked disease
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MDPI and ACS Style

Etter, J.L.; Moysich, K.; Kohli, S.; Lele, S.; Odunsi, K.; Eng, K.H. Transmission of X-linked Ovarian Cancer: Characterization and Implications. Diagnostics 2020, 10, 90. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10020090

AMA Style

Etter JL, Moysich K, Kohli S, Lele S, Odunsi K, Eng KH. Transmission of X-linked Ovarian Cancer: Characterization and Implications. Diagnostics. 2020; 10(2):90. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10020090

Chicago/Turabian Style

Etter, John L., Kirsten Moysich, Shaun Kohli, Shashikant Lele, Kunle Odunsi, and Kevin H. Eng 2020. "Transmission of X-linked Ovarian Cancer: Characterization and Implications" Diagnostics 10, no. 2: 90. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10020090

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