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Routine Fluorescence Imaging to Detect Wound Bacteria Reduces Antibiotic Use and Antimicrobial Dressing Expenditure While Improving Healing Rates: Retrospective Analysis of 229 Foot Ulcers

Podiatry—Gillian Hanson Diabetes Centre, Whipps Cross Hospital, Waltham Forest ICD, North East London NHS Foundation Trust, London E11 1NR, UK
Diagnostics 2020, 10(11), 927; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10110927
Received: 28 October 2020 / Accepted: 7 November 2020 / Published: 10 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Rise of Diagnostics in the Treatment of Chronic Wounds)
Foot ulcers and their bacterial burden produce a significant strain on the National Healthcare System (NHS). Subjectivity of wound infection assessment makes appropriate dressing selection challenging. To aid point-of-care detection of bacterial burden, a fluorescence imaging device (MolecuLight i:X) was introduced to the Whipps Cross Hospital Podiatry clinic. This retrospective pre/post-analysis evaluated how implementation of fluorescence imaging impacted (1) antimicrobial dressings and antibiotics use and (2) wound healing rates. Over a 2-year period 229 lower extremity wounds were treated. Wound-related outcomes and antimicrobial dressing costs were quantified over 1-year before (2018/2019) and after (2019/2020) incorporating fluorescence imaging into routine practice. The period of fluorescence imaging saw a 27% increase in the number of wounds seen, yet annual antimicrobial dressing expenditure decreased by 33%. Implementation of fluorescence imaging was also associated with a 49% decrease in prescription of antimicrobial dressings, a 33% decrease in antibiotic prescriptions, and a 23% increase in wound healing rates within 12-weeks (48% vs. 39%), likely due to earlier bacterial detection and improved wound hygiene. This increased healing rate is projected to decrease annual wound costs by 10% (£762 per patient). Routine bacterial imaging appears to diminish clinical and economic burden to patients and the NHS. View Full-Text
Keywords: dressing selection; diabetic foot ulcer; antimicrobial; fluorescence imaging; wound assessment; bacteria; MolecuLight dressing selection; diabetic foot ulcer; antimicrobial; fluorescence imaging; wound assessment; bacteria; MolecuLight
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MDPI and ACS Style

Price, N. Routine Fluorescence Imaging to Detect Wound Bacteria Reduces Antibiotic Use and Antimicrobial Dressing Expenditure While Improving Healing Rates: Retrospective Analysis of 229 Foot Ulcers. Diagnostics 2020, 10, 927. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10110927

AMA Style

Price N. Routine Fluorescence Imaging to Detect Wound Bacteria Reduces Antibiotic Use and Antimicrobial Dressing Expenditure While Improving Healing Rates: Retrospective Analysis of 229 Foot Ulcers. Diagnostics. 2020; 10(11):927. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10110927

Chicago/Turabian Style

Price, Nadine. 2020. "Routine Fluorescence Imaging to Detect Wound Bacteria Reduces Antibiotic Use and Antimicrobial Dressing Expenditure While Improving Healing Rates: Retrospective Analysis of 229 Foot Ulcers" Diagnostics 10, no. 11: 927. https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10110927

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