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Open AccessArticle

Decreased Sound Tolerance in Tinnitus Patients

1
Tinnitus Department, World Hearing Center, Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Mokra 17, 05-830 Warsaw, Poland
2
Teleaudiology and Screening Examination Department, World Hearing Center, Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Mokra 17, 05-830 Warsaw, Poland
3
Oto-Rhino-Laryngology Clinic, World Hearing Center, Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Mokra 17, 05-830 Warsaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Life 2021, 11(2), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11020087
Received: 11 December 2020 / Revised: 22 January 2021 / Accepted: 22 January 2021 / Published: 26 January 2021
(1) Background: Decreased sound tolerance is a significant problem in tinnitus sufferers. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between tinnitus and decreased sound tolerance (hyperacusis and misophonia). (2) Methods: The study sample consisted of 74 patients with tinnitus and decreased sound tolerance. The procedure comprised patient interviews, pure tone audiometry, impedance audiometry, measurement of uncomfortable loudness levels, and administration of the Hyperacusis Questionnaire, Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, and Visual Analogue Scales. (3) Results: The majority (69%) of the patients reported that noise aggravated their tinnitus. The correlation between tinnitus and hyperacusis was found to be statistically significant and positive: r = 0.44; p < 0.01. The higher the tinnitus severity, the greater the hyperacusis. There was no correlation between misophonia and hyperacusis (r = 0.18; p > 0.05), or between misophonia and tinnitus (r = 0.06; p > 0.05). (4) Conclusions: For tinnitus patients the more significant problem was hyperacusis rather than misophonia. The diagnosis and treatment of decreased sound tolerance should take into account not only audiological, but also psychological problems of the patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: decreased sound tolerance; hyperacusis; misophonia; tinnitus decreased sound tolerance; hyperacusis; misophonia; tinnitus
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MDPI and ACS Style

Raj-Koziak, D.; Gos, E.; Kutyba, J.; Skarzynski, H.; Skarzynski, P.H. Decreased Sound Tolerance in Tinnitus Patients. Life 2021, 11, 87. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11020087

AMA Style

Raj-Koziak D, Gos E, Kutyba J, Skarzynski H, Skarzynski PH. Decreased Sound Tolerance in Tinnitus Patients. Life. 2021; 11(2):87. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11020087

Chicago/Turabian Style

Raj-Koziak, Danuta; Gos, Elżbieta; Kutyba, Justyna; Skarzynski, Henryk; Skarzynski, Piotr H. 2021. "Decreased Sound Tolerance in Tinnitus Patients" Life 11, no. 2: 87. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11020087

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