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Article

Serology for Borrelia spp. in Northwest Italy: A Climate-Matched 10-Year Trend

1
Infectious Diseases Unit, Department of Medical Sciences, Amedeo di Savoia Hospital, University of Turin, 10149 Turin, Italy
2
Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, 00168 Rome, Italy
3
Unit of Infectious Diseases, Cardinal Massaia Hospital, 14100 Asti, Italy
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Laboratory of Microbiology and Virology, Ospedale Amedeo di Savoia, ASL “Città di Torino”, 10149 Turin, Italy
5
Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, 10149 Turin, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Anca Oana Docea and Daniela Calina
Life 2021, 11(12), 1310; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11121310
Received: 21 October 2021 / Revised: 23 November 2021 / Accepted: 24 November 2021 / Published: 27 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Old and New Pandemics: Challenges for Humans)
Ticks are hematophagous parasites that can transmit a variety of human pathogens, and their life cycle is dependent on several climatic factors for development and survival. We conducted a study in Piedmont and Aosta Valley, Italy, between 2009 and 2018. The study matched human sample serologies for Borrelia spp. with publicly available climatic and meteorological data. A total of 12,928 serological immunofluorescence assays (IFA) and Western blot (WB) tests were analysed. The median number of IFA and WB tests per year was 1236 (range 700–1997), with the highest demand in autumn 2018 (N = 289). In the study period, positive WB showed an increasing trend, peaking in 2018 for both IgM (N = 97) and IgG (N = 61). These results were consistent with a regional climatic variation trending towards an increase in both temperature and humidity. Our results suggest that coupling data from epidemiology and the environment, and the use of a “one health” approach, may provide a powerful tool in understanding disease transmission and strengthen collaboration between specialists in the era of climate instability. View Full-Text
Keywords: tick-borne-diseases; climate change; Borrelia spp.; northwest Italy; zoonosis; ticks tick-borne-diseases; climate change; Borrelia spp.; northwest Italy; zoonosis; ticks
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MDPI and ACS Style

Stroffolini, G.; Segala, F.V.; Lupia, T.; Faraoni, S.; Rossi, L.; Tomassone, L.; Zanet, S.; De Rosa, F.G.; Di Perri, G.; Calcagno, A. Serology for Borrelia spp. in Northwest Italy: A Climate-Matched 10-Year Trend. Life 2021, 11, 1310. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11121310

AMA Style

Stroffolini G, Segala FV, Lupia T, Faraoni S, Rossi L, Tomassone L, Zanet S, De Rosa FG, Di Perri G, Calcagno A. Serology for Borrelia spp. in Northwest Italy: A Climate-Matched 10-Year Trend. Life. 2021; 11(12):1310. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11121310

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stroffolini, Giacomo, Francesco V. Segala, Tommaso Lupia, Silvia Faraoni, Luca Rossi, Laura Tomassone, Stefania Zanet, Francesco G. De Rosa, Giovanni Di Perri, and Andrea Calcagno. 2021. "Serology for Borrelia spp. in Northwest Italy: A Climate-Matched 10-Year Trend" Life 11, no. 12: 1310. https://doi.org/10.3390/life11121310

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