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Integrated RNA-seq Analysis Indicates Asynchrony in Clock Genes between Tissues under Spaceflight

1
Doctoral Program in Biomedical Sciences, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575, Japan
2
Department of Genome Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Life 2020, 10(9), 196; https://doi.org/10.3390/life10090196
Received: 18 August 2020 / Revised: 8 September 2020 / Accepted: 10 September 2020 / Published: 11 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Space Life Sciences)
Rodent models have been widely used as analogs for estimating spaceflight-relevant molecular mechanisms in human tissues. NASA GeneLab provides access to numerous spaceflight omics datasets that can potentially generate novel insights and hypotheses about fundamental space biology when analyzed in new and integrated fashions. Here, we performed a pilot study to elucidate space biological mechanisms across tissues by reanalyzing mouse RNA-sequencing spaceflight data archived on NASA GeneLab. Our results showed that clock gene expressions in spaceflight mice were altered compared with those in ground control mice. Furthermore, the results suggested that spaceflight promotes asynchrony of clock gene expressions between peripheral tissues. Abnormal circadian rhythms are associated not only with jet lag and sleep disorders but also with cancer, lifestyle-related diseases, and mental disorders. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of elucidating the causes of circadian rhythm disruptions using the unique approach of space biology research to one day potentially develop countermeasures that benefit humans on Earth and in space. View Full-Text
Keywords: circadian rhythm; RNA-seq; bioinformatics; genomics; gene expression; microgravity; spaceflight; space biology circadian rhythm; RNA-seq; bioinformatics; genomics; gene expression; microgravity; spaceflight; space biology
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fujita, S.-i.; Rutter, L.; Ong, Q.; Muratani, M. Integrated RNA-seq Analysis Indicates Asynchrony in Clock Genes between Tissues under Spaceflight. Life 2020, 10, 196. https://doi.org/10.3390/life10090196

AMA Style

Fujita S-i, Rutter L, Ong Q, Muratani M. Integrated RNA-seq Analysis Indicates Asynchrony in Clock Genes between Tissues under Spaceflight. Life. 2020; 10(9):196. https://doi.org/10.3390/life10090196

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fujita, Shin-ichiro; Rutter, Lindsay; Ong, Quang; Muratani, Masafumi. 2020. "Integrated RNA-seq Analysis Indicates Asynchrony in Clock Genes between Tissues under Spaceflight" Life 10, no. 9: 196. https://doi.org/10.3390/life10090196

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