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Open AccessArticle

Age and Origin of Silicocarbonate Pegmatites of the Adirondack Region

1
Department of Geology, St. Lawrence University, Canton, NY 13617, USA
2
New York State Museum, Research and Collections, Albany, NY 12230, USA
3
Geosciences Department, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323, USA
4
Earth and Environmental Sciences, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Rensselaer, NY 12180, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2019, 9(9), 508; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9090508
Received: 24 July 2019 / Revised: 10 August 2019 / Accepted: 19 August 2019 / Published: 23 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Minerals of the Southern Grenville Province)
Silicocarbonate pegmatites from the southern Grenville Province have provided exceptionally large crystal specimens for more than a century. Their mineral parageneses include euhedral calc–silicate minerals such as amphibole, clinopyroxene, and scapolite within a calcite matrix. Crystals can reach a meter or more in long dimension. Minor and locally abundant phases reflect local bedrock compositions and include albite, apatite, perthitic microcline, phlogopite, zircon, tourmaline, titanite, danburite, uraninite, sulfides, and many other minerals. Across the Adirondack Region, individual exposures are of limited aerial extent (<10,000 m2), crosscut metasedimentary rocks, especially calc–silicate gneisses and marbles, are undeformed and are spatially and temporally associated with granitic pegmatites. Zircon U–Pb results include both Shawinigan (circa 1165 Ma) and Ottawan (circa 1050 Ma) intrusion ages, separated by the Carthage-Colton shear zone. Those of Shawinigan age (Lowlands) correspond with the timing of voluminous A-type granitic magmatism, whereas Ottawan ages (Highlands) are temporally related to orogenic collapse, voluminous leucogranite and granitic pegmatite intrusion, iron and garnet ore development, and pervasive localized hydrothermal alteration. Inherited zircon, where present, reflects the broad range of igneous and detrital ages of surrounding rocks. Carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios from calcite plot within a restricted field away from igneous carbonatite values to those of typical sedimentary carbonates and local marbles. Collectively, these exposures represent a continuum between vein-dyke and skarn occurrences involving the anatexis of metasedimentary country rocks. Those of Ottawan age can be tied to movement and fluid flow along structures accommodating orogenic collapse, particularly the Carthage-Colton shear zone. View Full-Text
Keywords: silicocarbonate; Grenville Province; Adirondack Mountains; Carthage-Colton shear zone; U–Pb zircon geochronology; exhumation; Ottawan Orogeny; calc–silicate minerals; vein-dykes; skarns silicocarbonate; Grenville Province; Adirondack Mountains; Carthage-Colton shear zone; U–Pb zircon geochronology; exhumation; Ottawan Orogeny; calc–silicate minerals; vein-dykes; skarns
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Chiarenzelli, J.; Lupulescu, M.; Robinson, G.; Bailey, D.; Singer, J. Age and Origin of Silicocarbonate Pegmatites of the Adirondack Region. Minerals 2019, 9, 508.

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