Next Article in Journal
The Prismatic Layer of Pinna: A Showcase of Methodological Problems and Preconceived Hypotheses
Previous Article in Journal
Authigenic Clay Minerals from Interface Reactions of Concrete-Clay Engineered Barriers: A New Perspective on Mg-Clays Formation in Alkaline Environments
Article Menu
Issue 9 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

The Arsenic Fault-Pathfinder: A Complementary Tool to Improve Structural Models in Mining

1
Advanced Mining Technology Center (AMTC), FCFM, University of Chile, 8320000 Santiago, Chile
2
Geomechanical Superintendence, Los Bronces Division, Anglo American Chile, 8320000 Santiago, Chile
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2018, 8(9), 364; https://doi.org/10.3390/min8090364
Received: 5 July 2018 / Revised: 10 August 2018 / Accepted: 17 August 2018 / Published: 21 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Mineral Deposits)
  |  
PDF [8196 KB, uploaded 21 August 2018]
  |  

Abstract

In a mining operation, the structural model is considered as a first-order data required for planning. During the start-up and in-depth expansion of an operation, whether the case is open-pit or underground, the structural model must be systematically updated because most common failure mechanisms of a rock mass are generally controlled by geological discontinuities. This update represents one of the main responsibilities for structural geologists and mine engineers. For that purpose, our study presents a geochemically-developed tool based on the tridimensional (3-D) distribution of arsenic concentrations, which have been quantified with a very high-density of blast-holes sampling points throughout an open pit operation. Our results show that the arsenic spatial distribution clearly denotes alignments that match with faults that were previously recognized by classical direct mapping techniques. Consequently, the 3-D arsenic distribution can be used to endorse the existence and even more the real persistence of structures as well as the cross-cutting relationships between faults. In conclusion, by linking the arsenic fault-pathfinder tool to direct on field fault mapping, it is possible to improve structural models at mine scale, focusing on geotechnical design and management, with a direct impact in the generation of safety mining activities. View Full-Text
Keywords: mining structural models; mining planning optimization; geotechnical designs; geochemical tool; arsenic mining structural models; mining planning optimization; geotechnical designs; geochemical tool; arsenic
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Carrizo, D.; Barros, C.; Velasquez, G. The Arsenic Fault-Pathfinder: A Complementary Tool to Improve Structural Models in Mining. Minerals 2018, 8, 364.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Minerals EISSN 2075-163X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top