Next Article in Journal
Production, Reserves, and Processing of Feldspar and Feldspathoid Rocks in the Czech Republic from 2005 to 2019—An Overview
Next Article in Special Issue
A Geospatial Database for Effective Mine Rehabilitation in Australia
Previous Article in Journal
New Data on the Isomorphism in Eudialyte-Group Minerals. 2. Crystal-Chemical Mechanisms of Blocky Isomorphism at the Key Sites
Previous Article in Special Issue
Electrical Resistivity Tomography as a Support Tool for Physicochemical Properties Assessment of Near-Surface Waste Materials in a Mining Tailing Pond (El Gorguel, SE Spain)
Open AccessArticle

Assessing Options for Remediation of Contaminated Mine Site Drainage Entering the River Teign, Southwest England

School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drakes Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2020, 10(8), 721; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10080721
Received: 10 July 2020 / Revised: 11 August 2020 / Accepted: 13 August 2020 / Published: 17 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Use of Abandoned Mines)
The river Teign in Devon has come under scrutiny for failing to meet environmental quality standards for ecotoxic metals due to past mining operations. A disused mine known as Bridford Barytes mine, has been found to contribute a significant source of Zn, Cd and Pb to the river. Recently, studies have been focused on the remediation of such mine sites using low-cost treatment methods to help reduce metal loads to the river downstream. This paper explores the metal removal efficiency of red mud, a waste product from the aluminium industry, which has proven to be an attractive low-cost treatment method for adsorbing toxic metals. Adsorption kinetics and capacity experiments reveal metal removal efficiencies of up to 70% within the first 2 h when red mud is applied in pelletized form. Further, it highlights the potential of biochar, another effective adsorbent observed to remove >90% Zn using agricultural feedstock. Compliance of the Teign has been investigated by analysing dissolved metal concentrations and bioavailable fractions of Zn to assess if levels are of environmental concern. By applying a real-world application model, this study reveals that compressed pellets and agricultural biochar offer an effective, low-cost option to reducing metal concentrations and thus improving the quality of the river Teign. View Full-Text
Keywords: trace metals; mine remediation; zinc; red media; biochar trace metals; mine remediation; zinc; red media; biochar
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Jordan, A.; Hill, R.; Turner, A.; Roberts, T.; Comber, S. Assessing Options for Remediation of Contaminated Mine Site Drainage Entering the River Teign, Southwest England. Minerals 2020, 10, 721. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10080721

AMA Style

Jordan A, Hill R, Turner A, Roberts T, Comber S. Assessing Options for Remediation of Contaminated Mine Site Drainage Entering the River Teign, Southwest England. Minerals. 2020; 10(8):721. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10080721

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jordan, Abigail; Hill, Rachel; Turner, Adrienne; Roberts, Tyrone; Comber, Sean. 2020. "Assessing Options for Remediation of Contaminated Mine Site Drainage Entering the River Teign, Southwest England" Minerals 10, no. 8: 721. https://doi.org/10.3390/min10080721

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop