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Confronting the Issue of Invasive Native Tree Species Due to Land Use Change in the Eastern United States

Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, Rapid City, SD 57702, USA
Academic Editor: Sean Sloan
Land 2022, 11(2), 161; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11020161
Received: 15 December 2021 / Revised: 18 January 2022 / Accepted: 19 January 2022 / Published: 20 January 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land: 10th Anniversary)
The increased abundance of historically rare native tree species is symptomatic of land-use change, which causes ecosystem regime shifts. I tested for an association between mean agricultural area, a proxy for land-use change, and native tree species. I first modeled agricultural area during the years 1850 to 1997 and the historical and current percent composition of tree genera, along with the dissimilarity and difference between the historical and current composition, for the northern part of the eastern U.S. I then modeled agricultural area and current genera and species for the eastern U.S. and regionally. For the northeast, agricultural area was most associated (R2 of 78%) with the current percentage of elms and a diverse, uncommon “other” genera. For the eastern U.S., Ulmus, Juglans, Prunus, boxelder (Acer negundo), black cherry (Prunus serotina), and hackberry (Celtis occidentalis) best predicted agricultural area (R2 of 66%). Regionally, two elm and ash species, black walnut (Juglans nigra), mockernut hickory (Carya tomentosa), red maple (Acer rubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) increased with agricultural area. Increases in historically rare and diverse species associated with agricultural area represent an overall pattern of invasive native tree species that have replaced historical ecosystems after land-use change disrupted historical vegetation and disturbance regimes. View Full-Text
Keywords: agriculture; disturbance; diversity; encroachment; historical; invasive; native; regime shift; state transition agriculture; disturbance; diversity; encroachment; historical; invasive; native; regime shift; state transition
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hanberry, B.B. Confronting the Issue of Invasive Native Tree Species Due to Land Use Change in the Eastern United States. Land 2022, 11, 161. https://doi.org/10.3390/land11020161

AMA Style

Hanberry BB. Confronting the Issue of Invasive Native Tree Species Due to Land Use Change in the Eastern United States. Land. 2022; 11(2):161. https://doi.org/10.3390/land11020161

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hanberry, Brice B. 2022. "Confronting the Issue of Invasive Native Tree Species Due to Land Use Change in the Eastern United States" Land 11, no. 2: 161. https://doi.org/10.3390/land11020161

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