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Article

Timber Losses during Harvesting in Managed Shorea robusta Forests of Nepal

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Institute of Landscape Ecology and Nature Conservation, University of Greifswald, Soldmannstraße 15, Room 1.40, 17489 Greifswald, Germany
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Institute of Wood Science, World Forestry, University of Hamburg, Leuschnerstr. 91e, 21031 Hamburg, Germany
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Friends of Nature, P.O. Box 23491, Kathmandu 44600, Nepal
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Division Forest Office, Palpa, Tansen 6, P.O. Box 32500, Palpa 32505, Nepal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Daniel S Mendham and Guillermo J. Martinez-Pastur
Land 2022, 11(1), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11010067
Received: 7 October 2021 / Revised: 27 December 2021 / Accepted: 29 December 2021 / Published: 2 January 2022
Logging and sawing of timber using conventional tools by unskilled workers causes enormous damage to the valuable timber, residual stand, regeneration, and forest soil in Nepal. The purpose of this study was to find out the volume reduction factor and identify major strategies to reduce timber losses in the tree harvesting process in the Terai Shorea robusta forest of Nepal. Field measurements and product flow analysis of 51 felled trees from felling coupes and randomly selected 167 sawed logs were examined to study harvesting losses. Responses from 116 forest experts were analyzed to explore strategies for reducing harvesting and processing losses. The results showed that timber losses in the felling and bucking stage with and without stem rot were 23% and 22%, respectively. Similarly, timber losses in the sawing stage with and without stem rot were 31% and 30%, respectively. Paired t-test at 5% level of significance revealed that there was significant loss in both tree felling and log sawing stages with present harvesting practice. The most leading factor contributing to timber loss in all of the three stages was the use of inappropriate equipment during tree harvesting. Use of synthetic ropes for directional felling and skidding as well as flexible and portable sawing machine with size adjustment options during sawing were mainly recommended as strategies to reduce timber losses. This study serves as a baseline study to identify and quantify timber losses in different stages of tree conversion and also formulate their reduction strategies in Nepal. View Full-Text
Keywords: harvesting tools; reduction strategies; Terai Shorea robusta forest; tree harvesting losses harvesting tools; reduction strategies; Terai Shorea robusta forest; tree harvesting losses
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MDPI and ACS Style

Aryal, U.; Neupane, P.R.; Rijal, B.; Manthey, M. Timber Losses during Harvesting in Managed Shorea robusta Forests of Nepal. Land 2022, 11, 67. https://doi.org/10.3390/land11010067

AMA Style

Aryal U, Neupane PR, Rijal B, Manthey M. Timber Losses during Harvesting in Managed Shorea robusta Forests of Nepal. Land. 2022; 11(1):67. https://doi.org/10.3390/land11010067

Chicago/Turabian Style

Aryal, Upendra, Prem R. Neupane, Bhawana Rijal, and Michael Manthey. 2022. "Timber Losses during Harvesting in Managed Shorea robusta Forests of Nepal" Land 11, no. 1: 67. https://doi.org/10.3390/land11010067

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