Next Article in Journal
Decoding the Street-Based Spatiality of Urban Gyms: Implications for Healthy City Planning
Next Article in Special Issue
Derivation of Heat Conductivity from Temperature and Heat Flux Measurements in Soil
Previous Article in Journal
Qualifying Land Use and Land Cover Dynamics and Their Impacts on Ecosystem Service in Central Himalaya Transboundary Landscape Based on Google Earth Engine
Article

Assessment and Spatial Planning for Peatland Conservation and Restoration: Europe’s Trans-Border Neman River Basin as a Case Study

1
Institute of Forest Biology and Silviculture, Faculty of Forest Science and Ecology, Vytautas Magnus University, Studentu 13, LT-53362 Akademija, 44248 Kaunas, Lithuania
2
Faculty of Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Bialystok University of Technology, Wiejska 45 E, 15-351 Bialystok, Poland
3
Institute of Environmental Engineering, Warsaw University of Life Sciences-SGGW, Nowoursynowska 166, 02-999 Warsaw, Poland
4
Foundation for Peatlands Restoration and Conservation, Zirmunu 58-59, LT-09100 Vilnius, Lithuania
5
Lithuanian Fund for Nature, Algirdo 22-3, LT-03218 Vilnius, Lithuania
6
Institute of Botany, Nature Research Centre, Žaliųjų Ežerų 49, LT-12200 Vilnius, Lithuania
7
Michael Succow Foundation, Partner in the Greifswald Mire Centre, Ellernholzstrasse 1/3, 17489 Greifswald, Germany
8
Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, 36, Nahimovskiy Prospekt, 117997 Moscow, Russia
9
Experimental Plant Ecology, Partner in the Greifswald Mire Centre, Institute for Botany and Landscape Ecology, Greifswald University, 17489 Greifswald, Germany
10
School for Forest Management, Faculty of Forest Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-739 21 Skinnskatteberg, Sweden
11
Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, Faculty of Applied Ecology, Agricultural Sciences and Biotechnology, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Campus Evenstad, N-2480 Koppang, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Tatiana Minayeva and Elena D. Lapshina
Land 2021, 10(2), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020174
Received: 7 December 2020 / Revised: 1 February 2021 / Accepted: 3 February 2021 / Published: 8 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Peatland Ecosystem)
Peatlands are the “kidneys” of river basins. However, intensification of agriculture and forestry in Europe has resulted in the degradation of peatlands and their biodiversity (i.e., species, habitats and processes in ecosystems), thus impairing water retention, nutrient filtration, and carbon capture. Restoration of peatlands requires assessment of patterns and processes, and spatial planning. To support strategic planning of protection, management, and restoration of peatlands, we assessed the conservation status of three peatland types within the trans-border Neman River basin. First, we compiled a spatial peatland database for the two EU and two non-EU countries involved. Second, we performed quantitative and qualitative gap analyses of fens, transitional mires, and raised bogs at national and sub-basin levels. Third, we identified priority areas for local peatland restoration using a local hotspot analysis. Nationally, the gap analysis showed that the protection of peatlands meets the Convention of Biological Diversity’s quantitative target of 17%. However, qualitative targets like representation and peatland qualities were not met in some regional sub-basins. This stresses that restoration of peatlands, especially fens, is required. This study provides an assessment methodology to support sub-basin-level spatial conservation planning that considers both quantitative and qualitative peatland properties. Finally, we highlight the need for developing and validating evidence-based performance targets for peatland patterns and processes and call for peatland restoration guided by social-ecological research and inter-sectoral collaborative governance. View Full-Text
Keywords: Baltic Sea region; bog; environmental history; fen; gap analysis; governance; pattern and process; quantitative and qualitative Aichi targets; re-wetting; wetlands Baltic Sea region; bog; environmental history; fen; gap analysis; governance; pattern and process; quantitative and qualitative Aichi targets; re-wetting; wetlands
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Manton, M.; Makrickas, E.; Banaszuk, P.; Kołos, A.; Kamocki, A.; Grygoruk, M.; Stachowicz, M.; Jarašius, L.; Zableckis, N.; Sendžikaitė, J.; Peters, J.; Napreenko, M.; Wichtmann, W.; Angelstam, P. Assessment and Spatial Planning for Peatland Conservation and Restoration: Europe’s Trans-Border Neman River Basin as a Case Study. Land 2021, 10, 174. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020174

AMA Style

Manton M, Makrickas E, Banaszuk P, Kołos A, Kamocki A, Grygoruk M, Stachowicz M, Jarašius L, Zableckis N, Sendžikaitė J, Peters J, Napreenko M, Wichtmann W, Angelstam P. Assessment and Spatial Planning for Peatland Conservation and Restoration: Europe’s Trans-Border Neman River Basin as a Case Study. Land. 2021; 10(2):174. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020174

Chicago/Turabian Style

Manton, Michael, Evaldas Makrickas, Piotr Banaszuk, Aleksander Kołos, Andrzej Kamocki, Mateusz Grygoruk, Marta Stachowicz, Leonas Jarašius, Nerijus Zableckis, Jūratė Sendžikaitė, Jan Peters, Maxim Napreenko, Wendelin Wichtmann, and Per Angelstam. 2021. "Assessment and Spatial Planning for Peatland Conservation and Restoration: Europe’s Trans-Border Neman River Basin as a Case Study" Land 10, no. 2: 174. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10020174

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop