Next Article in Journal
Achieving Partial Nitritation in Anammox Start-Up Environment
Next Article in Special Issue
Copper and Zinc as Roofing Materials—A Review on the Occurrence and Mitigation Measures of Runoff Pollution
Previous Article in Journal
Stochastic Flood Risk Assessment under Climate Change Scenarios for Toronto, Canada Using CAPRA
Previous Article in Special Issue
Leaching and Transformation of Film Preservatives in Paints Induced by Combined Exposure to Ultraviolet Radiation and Water Contact under Controlled Laboratory Conditions
 
 
Article

Environmental Impact of Construction Products on Aquatic Systems—Principles of an Integrated Source–Path–Target Concept

1
Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin, Germany
2
Unit for Mathematics and Natural Science, Eastern Switzerland University of Applied Sciences, Oberseestrasse 10, 8640 Rapperswil, Switzerland
3
Dr. Robert-Murjahn-Institute GmbH, Industriestraße 12, 64372 Ober-Ramstadt, Germany
4
Institute of Environmental and Process Engineering (UMTEC), Eastern Switzerland University of Applied Sciences, Oberseestrasse 10, 8640 Rapperswil, Switzerland
5
Institute of Building Materials Research (ibac), RWTH Aachen University, Schinkelstraße 3, 52062 Aachen, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Francesco De Paola
Water 2022, 14(2), 228; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14020228
Received: 30 November 2021 / Revised: 21 December 2021 / Accepted: 1 January 2022 / Published: 13 January 2022
Buildings exposed to water can release undesirable substances which, once transported to environmental compartments, may cause unwanted effects. These exposure pathways need to be investigated and included in risk assessments to safeguard water quality and promote the sustainability of construction materials. The applied materials, exposure conditions, distribution routes and resilience of receiving compartments vary considerably. This demonstrates the need for a consistent concept that integrates knowledge of emission sources, leaching processes, transport pathways, and effects on targets. Such a consistent concept can serve as the basis for environmental risk assessment for several scenarios using experimentally determined emissions. Typically, a source–path–target concept integrates data from standardized leaching tests and models to describe leaching processes, the distribution of substances in the environment and the occurrence of substances at different points of compliance. This article presents an integrated concept for assessing the environmental impact of construction products on aquatic systems and unravels currently existing gaps and necessary actions. This manuscript outlines a source–path–target concept applicable to a large variety of construction products. It is intended to highlight key elements of a holistic evaluation concept that could assist authorities in developing procedures for environmental risk assessments and mitigation measures and identifying knowledge gaps. View Full-Text
Keywords: construction products; environmental impact; assessment; concept construction products; environmental impact; assessment; concept
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Schoknecht, U.; Tietje, O.; Borho, N.; Burkhardt, M.; Rohr, M.; Vollpracht, A.; Weiler, L. Environmental Impact of Construction Products on Aquatic Systems—Principles of an Integrated Source–Path–Target Concept. Water 2022, 14, 228. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14020228

AMA Style

Schoknecht U, Tietje O, Borho N, Burkhardt M, Rohr M, Vollpracht A, Weiler L. Environmental Impact of Construction Products on Aquatic Systems—Principles of an Integrated Source–Path–Target Concept. Water. 2022; 14(2):228. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14020228

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schoknecht, Ute, Olaf Tietje, Nicole Borho, Michael Burkhardt, Mirko Rohr, Anya Vollpracht, and Lia Weiler. 2022. "Environmental Impact of Construction Products on Aquatic Systems—Principles of an Integrated Source–Path–Target Concept" Water 14, no. 2: 228. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14020228

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop