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Article

Disaster-Resilient Communities on Flood Plains and Their Agricultural Regeneration: A Case Study in Meinong Plain, Taiwan

by 1 and 2,*
1
College of Arts and Design, Jimei University, Xiamen 361021, China
2
Department of Geography, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 10644, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Su-Chin Chen
Water 2022, 14(11), 1736; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14111736
Received: 4 April 2022 / Revised: 24 May 2022 / Accepted: 24 May 2022 / Published: 28 May 2022
Taiwan’s near-mountain alluvial plain is a high-risk area with frequent disasters, and residents have become more tolerant of the compound disasters that occur with overall environmental changes associated with the development of urbanization in recent years. This paper presents a case study of a near-mountainous alluvial plain in Southern Taiwan. The Hakka ethnic group is the main community in the study area and also the main research object. This case study illustrates the disaster resilience of the community to natural and artificial disasters. This study adopted two research approaches, namely historical geography and political economic geography, as well as community resilience theory. Research methods including case study, secondary literature analysis, fieldwork, and interviews were used. Through text analysis, it was found that (1) the community’s awareness of disaster avoidance was rooted in the experience of reclamation in the early 17th century; (2) communities have experienced artificial disasters caused by political and economic intervention, which have been transformed into disaster awareness and community resilience; (3) cumulative artificial disasters have a greater impact on communities than unpredictable natural disasters; and (4) the energy of community resilience and agricultural regeneration is based on the duality of disasters. View Full-Text
Keywords: actions; reorganization; artificial disaster; young farmer; resilience community actions; reorganization; artificial disaster; young farmer; resilience community
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tsai, S.-C.; Lee, S.-H. Disaster-Resilient Communities on Flood Plains and Their Agricultural Regeneration: A Case Study in Meinong Plain, Taiwan. Water 2022, 14, 1736. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14111736

AMA Style

Tsai S-C, Lee S-H. Disaster-Resilient Communities on Flood Plains and Their Agricultural Regeneration: A Case Study in Meinong Plain, Taiwan. Water. 2022; 14(11):1736. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14111736

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tsai, Shu-Chen, and Su-Hsin Lee. 2022. "Disaster-Resilient Communities on Flood Plains and Their Agricultural Regeneration: A Case Study in Meinong Plain, Taiwan" Water 14, no. 11: 1736. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14111736

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