Next Article in Journal
Flood Risk-Related Research Trends in Latin America and the Caribbean
Next Article in Special Issue
Geomatic-Based Flood Loss Assessment and Its Application in an Eastern City of China
Previous Article in Journal
Response of Physicochemical and Microbiological Properties to the Application of Effective Microorganisms in the Water of the Turawa Reservoir
Previous Article in Special Issue
Threats to Cultural Heritage Caused by the Global Sea Level Rise as a Result of the Global Warming
Article

The Impact of Sea-Level Rise on Urban Properties in Tampa Due to Climate Change

by 1, 2 and 1,*
1
Department of Geosciences, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 39762, USA
2
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 39762, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Damien Serre and Christophe Viavattene
Water 2022, 14(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/w14010013
Received: 22 November 2021 / Revised: 14 December 2021 / Accepted: 18 December 2021 / Published: 22 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue GIS Application: Flood Risk Management)
Fast urbanization produces a large and growing population in coastal areas. However, the increasing rise in sea levels, one of the most impacts of global warming, makes coastal communities much more vulnerable to flooding than before. While most existing work focuses on understanding the large-scale impacts of sea-level rise, this paper investigates parcel-level property impacts, using a specific coastal city, Tampa, Florida, USA, as an empirical study. This research adopts a spatial-temporal analysis method to identify locations of flooded properties and their costs over a future period. A corrected sea-level rise model based on satellite altimeter data is first used to predict future global mean sea levels. Based on high-resolution LiDAR digital elevation data and property maps, properties to be flooded are identified to evaluate property damage cost. This empirical analysis provides deep understanding of potential flooding risks for individual properties with detailed spatial information, including residential, commercial, industrial, agriculture, and governmental buildings, at a fine spatial scale under three different levels of global warming. The flooded property maps not only help residents to choose location of their properties, but also enable local governments to prevent potential sea-level rising risks for better urban planning. Both spatial and temporal analyses can be easily applied by researchers or governments to other coastal cities for sea-level rise- and climate change-related urban planning and management. View Full-Text
Keywords: sea-level rise; granular analysis; economic impact analysis; urban planning; climate change sea-level rise; granular analysis; economic impact analysis; urban planning; climate change
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Xie, W.; Tang, B.; Meng, Q. The Impact of Sea-Level Rise on Urban Properties in Tampa Due to Climate Change. Water 2022, 14, 13. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14010013

AMA Style

Xie W, Tang B, Meng Q. The Impact of Sea-Level Rise on Urban Properties in Tampa Due to Climate Change. Water. 2022; 14(1):13. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14010013

Chicago/Turabian Style

Xie, Weiwei, Bo Tang, and Qingmin Meng. 2022. "The Impact of Sea-Level Rise on Urban Properties in Tampa Due to Climate Change" Water 14, no. 1: 13. https://doi.org/10.3390/w14010013

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop