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Article

Risk and Impact Assessment of Dams in the Contiguous United States Using the 2018 National Inventory of Dams Database

1
Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487, USA
2
Division of Environmental Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Zhi-jun Dai, Francesco De Paola and Piotr Matczak
Water 2021, 13(8), 1066; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13081066
Received: 15 February 2021 / Revised: 7 April 2021 / Accepted: 8 April 2021 / Published: 13 April 2021
Aging water infrastructure in the United States (U.S.) is a growing concern. In the U.S., over 90,000 dams were registered in the 2018 National Inventory of Dams (NID) database, and their average age was 57 years old. Here, we aim to assess spatiotemporal patterns of the growth of artificial water storage of the existing dams and their hazard potential and potential economic benefit. In this study, we use more than 70,000 NID-registered dams to assess the cumulative hazard potential of dam failure in terms of the total number and the cumulative maximum storage of dams over the 12 National Weather Service River Forecast Center (RFC) regions. In addition, we also estimate potential economic benefits of the existing dams based on their cumulative storage capacity. Results show that the ratios of the cumulative storage capacity to the long-term averaged precipitation range from 8% (Mid-Atlantic) to 50% (Colorado), indicating the significant anthropogenic contribution to the land surface water budget. We also find that the cumulative storage capacity of the dams with high (probable loss of human life is if the dam fails) and significant (potential economic loss and environmental damage with no probable casualty) hazard potential ranges from 50% (North Central) to 98% (Missouri and Colorado) of the total storage capacity within the corresponding region. Surprisingly, 43% of the dams with either high or significant potential hazards have no Emergency Action Plan. Potential economic benefits from the existing dams range from $0.7 billion (Mid Atlantic) to $15.4 billion (West Gulf). Spatiotemporal patterns of hazard potential and economic benefits from the NID-registered dams indicate a need for the development of region-specific preparation, emergency, and recovery plans for dam failure. This study provides an insight about how big data, such as the NID database, can provide actionable information for community resilience toward a safer and more sustainable environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: NID; impact assessment; anthropogenic influence; dam safety NID; impact assessment; anthropogenic influence; dam safety
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MDPI and ACS Style

Song, J.; Sciubba, M.; Kam, J. Risk and Impact Assessment of Dams in the Contiguous United States Using the 2018 National Inventory of Dams Database. Water 2021, 13, 1066. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13081066

AMA Style

Song J, Sciubba M, Kam J. Risk and Impact Assessment of Dams in the Contiguous United States Using the 2018 National Inventory of Dams Database. Water. 2021; 13(8):1066. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13081066

Chicago/Turabian Style

Song, Junho, Madden Sciubba, and Jonghun Kam. 2021. "Risk and Impact Assessment of Dams in the Contiguous United States Using the 2018 National Inventory of Dams Database" Water 13, no. 8: 1066. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13081066

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