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Article

Stream Temperature Response to 50% Strip-Thinning in a Temperate Forested Headwater Catchment

1
Symbiotic Science of Environment and Natural Resources, United Graduate School of Agriculture Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan
2
Graduate School of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 183-8509, Japan
3
Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T-1Z2, Canada
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Erosion and Sediment Control Research Group, Public Works Research Institute, Tsukuba 305-8516, Japan
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Center for Research in Isotopes and Environmental Dynamics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8577, Japan
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Department of Environmental Management, Vietnam National University of Forestry, Xuan Mai, Hanoi 13417, Vietnam
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Thomas Meixner
Water 2021, 13(8), 1022; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13081022
Received: 16 February 2021 / Revised: 22 March 2021 / Accepted: 5 April 2021 / Published: 8 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity and Forests)
Stream temperature is a critical parameter for understanding hydrological and biological processes in stream ecosystems. Although a large body of research has addressed the effects of forest harvesting on stream temperature, less is known about the responses of stream temperature to the practice of strip-thinning, which produces more coherent patches of shade and sunlight areas. In this study, we examined stream temperature response to 50% strip-thinning in a 17 ha headwater catchment. The thinning lines extended through the riparian zone. Paired-catchment analysis was applied to estimate changes in daily maximum, mean, and minimum stream temperatures for the first year following treatment. Significant effects on daily maximum stream temperature were found for April to August, ranging from 0.6 °C to 3.9 °C, similar to the magnitude of effect found in previous studies involving 50% random thinning. We conducted further analysis to identify the thermal response variability in relation to hydrometeorological drivers. Multiple regression analysis revealed that treatment effects for maximum daily stream temperature were positively related to solar radiation and negatively related to discharge. Frequent precipitation during the summer monsoon season produced moderate increases in discharge (from 1 to 5 mm day−1), mitigating stream temperature increases associated with solar radiation. Catchment hydrologic response to rain events can play an important role in controlling stream thermal response to forest management practices. View Full-Text
Keywords: stream temperature; strip-thinning; paired-catchment analysis; headwater stream; forest harvesting stream temperature; strip-thinning; paired-catchment analysis; headwater stream; forest harvesting
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MDPI and ACS Style

Oanh, D.Q.; Gomi, T.; Moore, R.D.; Chiu, C.-W.; Hiraoka, M.; Onda, Y.; Dung, B.X. Stream Temperature Response to 50% Strip-Thinning in a Temperate Forested Headwater Catchment. Water 2021, 13, 1022. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13081022

AMA Style

Oanh DQ, Gomi T, Moore RD, Chiu C-W, Hiraoka M, Onda Y, Dung BX. Stream Temperature Response to 50% Strip-Thinning in a Temperate Forested Headwater Catchment. Water. 2021; 13(8):1022. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13081022

Chicago/Turabian Style

Oanh, Dinh Q.; Gomi, Takashi; Moore, R. D.; Chiu, Chen-Wei; Hiraoka, Marino; Onda, Yuichi; Dung, Bui X. 2021. "Stream Temperature Response to 50% Strip-Thinning in a Temperate Forested Headwater Catchment" Water 13, no. 8: 1022. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13081022

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