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Open AccessArticle

International Perceptions of Urban Blue-Green Infrastructure: A Comparison across Four Cities

1
School of Geography, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, UK
2
Department of Economics, Reed College, Portland, OR 97202-8199, USA
3
Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Geographical Sciences, University of Nottingham Ningbo China, Ningbo 315100, China
4
School of Geography & [email protected] Research Institute, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
5
Royal HaskoningDHV, 1090 GE Amsterdam, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Vassilis Glenis and Claire Walsh
Water 2021, 13(4), 544; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040544
Received: 28 January 2021 / Revised: 11 February 2021 / Accepted: 17 February 2021 / Published: 20 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Blue-Green Cities for Urban Flood Resilience)
Blue-Green infrastructure (BGI) is recognised internationally as an approach for managing urban water challenges while enhancing society and the environment through the provision of multiple co-benefits. This research employed an online survey to investigate the perceptions of BGI held by professional stakeholders in four cities with established BGI programs: Newcastle (UK), Ningbo (China), Portland (Oregon USA), and Rotterdam (The Netherlands) (64 respondents). The results show that challenges associated with having too much water (e.g., pluvial and fluvial flood risk, water quality deterioration) are driving urban water management agendas. Perceptions of governance drivers for BGI implementation, BGI leaders, and strategies for improving BGI uptake, are markedly different in the four cities reflecting the varied local, regional and national responsibilities for BGI implementation. In addition to managing urban water, BGI is universally valued for its positive impact on residents’ quality of life; however, a transformative change in policy and practice towards truly multifunctional infrastructure is needed to optimise the delivery of multiple BGI benefits to address each city’s priorities and strategic objectives. Changes needed to improve BGI uptake, e.g., increasing the awareness of policy-makers to multifunctional BGI, has international relevance for other cities on their journeys to sustainable blue-green futures. View Full-Text
Keywords: blue-green infrastructure; perceptions; climate change adaptation; urban water management; resilience; multiple benefits blue-green infrastructure; perceptions; climate change adaptation; urban water management; resilience; multiple benefits
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MDPI and ACS Style

O’Donnell, E.C.; Netusil, N.R.; Chan, F.K.S.; Dolman, N.J.; Gosling, S.N. International Perceptions of Urban Blue-Green Infrastructure: A Comparison across Four Cities. Water 2021, 13, 544. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040544

AMA Style

O’Donnell EC, Netusil NR, Chan FKS, Dolman NJ, Gosling SN. International Perceptions of Urban Blue-Green Infrastructure: A Comparison across Four Cities. Water. 2021; 13(4):544. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040544

Chicago/Turabian Style

O’Donnell, Emily C.; Netusil, Noelwah R.; Chan, Faith K.S.; Dolman, Nanco J.; Gosling, Simon N. 2021. "International Perceptions of Urban Blue-Green Infrastructure: A Comparison across Four Cities" Water 13, no. 4: 544. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13040544

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