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Analysis of Long-Term Shoreline Observations in the Vicinity of Coastal Structures: A Case Study of South Bali Beaches

1
Graduate School of Water Resources, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon-si 16319, Korea
2
Directorate General of Water Resources, Ministry of Public Works and Housing, Jakarta 12110, Indonesia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Julie Kinzelman
Water 2021, 13(24), 3527; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243527
Received: 28 October 2021 / Revised: 6 December 2021 / Accepted: 7 December 2021 / Published: 9 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Oceans and Coastal Zones)
Recently, many rigid structures have been installed to cope with and efficiently manage coastal erosion. However, the changes in the coastline or isocenter and the movements of coastal sediment are poorly understood. This study examined the equilibrium shoreline and isocenter lines by applying a Model of Estimating Equilibrium Parabolic-type Shoreline (MeEPASoL) as an equilibrium shoreline prediction model. In addition, the inverse method was used to estimate littoral drift sediment transport from long-term beach profile observations. The movement of coastal sediments was analyzed using long-term beach profile observation data for three Indonesian beaches, namely, Kuta Beach for 13 years, Karang Beach in Sanur for 15 years, and Samuh Beach in Nusa Dua for 18 years. The littoral drift at every site was dynamically controlled by seasonal changes in the monsoon, the erosion and deposition patterns coupled with the presence of coastal structures, and limited sediment movement. Shoreline deformation in Kuta is generally backward deformed, with a littoral drift from south to north. In Sanur, the littoral drift vector carries sediment from the right and left sides and forms a salient behind the offshore breakwater. The littoral drift at Nusa Dua is dominantly from south to north, but the force of sediment transport decreases near the breakwater towards the north. Furthermore, the methods applied herein could aid the development of strategic coastal management plans to control erosion in subcells of coastal areas. View Full-Text
Keywords: beach profile observation; coastal erosion; coastal structure; littoral drift; shoreline deformation beach profile observation; coastal erosion; coastal structure; littoral drift; shoreline deformation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rahmawati, R.R.; Putro, A.H.S.; Lee, J.L. Analysis of Long-Term Shoreline Observations in the Vicinity of Coastal Structures: A Case Study of South Bali Beaches. Water 2021, 13, 3527. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243527

AMA Style

Rahmawati RR, Putro AHS, Lee JL. Analysis of Long-Term Shoreline Observations in the Vicinity of Coastal Structures: A Case Study of South Bali Beaches. Water. 2021; 13(24):3527. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243527

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rahmawati, Ria R., Anthony H.S. Putro, and Jung L. Lee. 2021. "Analysis of Long-Term Shoreline Observations in the Vicinity of Coastal Structures: A Case Study of South Bali Beaches" Water 13, no. 24: 3527. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13243527

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