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Article

Sediment Yield and Reservoir Sedimentation in Highly Dynamic Watersheds: The Case of Koga Reservoir, Ethiopia

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Australian River Institute and School of Engineering, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111, Australia
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CERIS, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-004 Lisbon, Portugal
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College of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Addis Ababa Science and Technology University, Addis Ababa P.O. Box 16417, Ethiopia
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State Climate Office of North Carolina, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
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Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
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Key Laboratory of Digital Earth Science, Aerospace Information Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100094, China
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Ethiopian Ministry of Water Resources, Addis Ababa P.O. Box 5744, Ethiopia
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Institute of Environment and Sustainable Development in Agriculture (IEDA), Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS), Beijing 100081, China
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College of Agricultural Engineering and Technology, Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology of Kashmir, Shalimar Campus, Srinagar 190025, India
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Ethiopian Institute of Water Resources, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa P.O. Box 150461, Ethiopia
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Blackland Research & Extension Center, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, 720 East Blackland Rd, Temple, TX 76502, USA
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Department of Earth and Environment, Institute of Environment, Florida International University, AHC-5-390, 11200 SW 8th Street, Miami, FL 33199, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Raghavan Srinivasan
Water 2021, 13(23), 3374; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13233374
Received: 24 October 2021 / Revised: 21 November 2021 / Accepted: 25 November 2021 / Published: 30 November 2021
Soil erosion is exacerbated by unsustainable land-use activities and poor management practices, undermining reservoir storage capacity. To this effect, appropriate estimation of sediment would help to adopt sustainable land-use activities and best management practices that lead to efficient reservoir operations. This paper aims to investigate the spatial variability of sediment yield, amount of sediment delivery into the reservoir, and reservoir sedimentation in the Koga Reservoir using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). Sediment yield and the amount entered into the reservoir were also estimated using a rating curve, providing an alternative approach to spatially referenced SWAT generated suspended sediment load. SWAT was calibrated from 1991 to 2000 and validated from 2002 to 2007 using monthly observations. Model performance indicators showed acceptable values using Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) correlation coefficient (R2), and percent bias (PBIAS) for flow (NSE = 0.75, R2 = 0.78, and PBIAS = 11.83%). There was also good agreement between measured and simulated sediment yields, with NSE, R2, and PBIAS validation values of 0.80, 0.79, and 6.4%, respectively. The measured rating curve and SWAT predictions showed comparable mean annual sediment values of 62,610.08 ton/yr and 58,012.87 ton/yr, respectively. This study provides an implication for the extent of management interventions required to meet sediment load targets to a receiving reservoir, providing a better understanding of catchment processes and responses to anthropogenic and natural stressors in mixed land use temperate climate catchments. Findings would benefit policymakers towards land and water management decisions and serve as a prototype for other catchments where management interventions may be implemented. Specifically, validating SWAT for the Koga Reservoir is a first step to support policymakers, who are faced with implementing land and water management decisions. View Full-Text
Keywords: sediment yield; Koga reservoir; SWAT; watershed prioritization; Tana Basin; Ethiopia sediment yield; Koga reservoir; SWAT; watershed prioritization; Tana Basin; Ethiopia
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ayele, G.T.; Kuriqi, A.; Jemberrie, M.A.; Saia, S.M.; Seka, A.M.; Teshale, E.Z.; Daba, M.H.; Ahmad Bhat, S.; Demissie, S.S.; Jeong, J.; Melesse, A.M. Sediment Yield and Reservoir Sedimentation in Highly Dynamic Watersheds: The Case of Koga Reservoir, Ethiopia. Water 2021, 13, 3374. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13233374

AMA Style

Ayele GT, Kuriqi A, Jemberrie MA, Saia SM, Seka AM, Teshale EZ, Daba MH, Ahmad Bhat S, Demissie SS, Jeong J, Melesse AM. Sediment Yield and Reservoir Sedimentation in Highly Dynamic Watersheds: The Case of Koga Reservoir, Ethiopia. Water. 2021; 13(23):3374. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13233374

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ayele, Gebiaw T., Alban Kuriqi, Mengistu A. Jemberrie, Sheila M. Saia, Ayalkibet M. Seka, Engidasew Z. Teshale, Mekonnen H. Daba, Shakeel Ahmad Bhat, Solomon S. Demissie, Jaehak Jeong, and Assefa M. Melesse. 2021. "Sediment Yield and Reservoir Sedimentation in Highly Dynamic Watersheds: The Case of Koga Reservoir, Ethiopia" Water 13, no. 23: 3374. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13233374

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