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Article

Estimating Regional Evapotranspiration Using a Satellite-Based Wind Speed Avoiding Priestley–Taylor Approach

1
State Key Laboratory of Hydrology-Water Resources and Hydraulic Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098, China
2
The Pearl River Water Resources Research Institute, Guangzhou 510611, China
3
Hydrology & Water Resources Department, Nanjing Hydraulic Research Institute, Nanjing 210029, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Zhenghong Tan and Ge Sun
Water 2021, 13(21), 3144; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213144
Received: 10 September 2021 / Revised: 12 October 2021 / Accepted: 17 October 2021 / Published: 8 November 2021
Wind speed (u) is a significant constraint in the evapotranspiration modeling over the highly heterogeneous regional surface due to its high temporal-spatial variation. In this study, a satellite-based Wind Speed Avoiding Priestley–Taylor (WAPT) algorithm was proposed to estimate the regional actual evapotranspiration by employing a u-independent theoretical trapezoidal space to determine the pixel Priestley–Taylor (PT) parameter Φ. The WAPT model was comprehensively evaluated with hydro-meteorological observations in the arid Heihe River Basin in northwestern China. The results show that the WAPT model can provide reliable latent heat flux estimations with the root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 46.0 W/m2 across 2013–2018 for 5 long-term observation stations and the RMSE of 49.6 W/m2 in the growing season in 2012 for 21 stations with intensive observations. The estimation by WAPT has a higher precision in the vegetation growing season than in the non-growing season. The estimation by WAPT has a closer agreement with the ground observations for vegetation-covered surfaces (e.g., corn and wetland) than that for dry sites (e.g., Gobi, desert, and desert steppe). View Full-Text
Keywords: evapotranspiration; remote sensing; trapezoidal space; wind speed; Priestley–Taylor equation evapotranspiration; remote sensing; trapezoidal space; wind speed; Priestley–Taylor equation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sun, J.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.; Huang, D. Estimating Regional Evapotranspiration Using a Satellite-Based Wind Speed Avoiding Priestley–Taylor Approach. Water 2021, 13, 3144. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213144

AMA Style

Sun J, Wang W, Wang X, Huang D. Estimating Regional Evapotranspiration Using a Satellite-Based Wind Speed Avoiding Priestley–Taylor Approach. Water. 2021; 13(21):3144. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213144

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sun, Jingjing, Wen Wang, Xiaogang Wang, and Dui Huang. 2021. "Estimating Regional Evapotranspiration Using a Satellite-Based Wind Speed Avoiding Priestley–Taylor Approach" Water 13, no. 21: 3144. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213144

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