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Article

Assessment of Coagulation–Flocculation Process Efficiency for the Natural Organic Matter Removal in Drinking Water Treatment

Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, “Cristofor Simionescu” Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, “Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, 73 D. Mangeron Street, 700050 Iasi, Romania
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Academic Editor: Alexandre T. Paulino
Water 2021, 13(21), 3073; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213073
Received: 5 October 2021 / Revised: 23 October 2021 / Accepted: 30 October 2021 / Published: 2 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Wastewater Treatment and Reuse)
Natural organic matter (NOM) represents a range of heterogeneous hydrophobic and hydrophilic components naturally occurring in the water source and, due to the fact that they can act as precursors for the disinfection, by-products may have a considerable impact on drinking water quality. Coagulation–flocculation (C/F) is among the most applied processes for NOM removal from water sources (especially rivers). In this study, C/F efficiency for a river water supply was investigated in cold and warm conditions, by varying the coagulant dose and mixing conditions. In this study, polyhydroxy aluminum chloride PAX XL 60, and polyacrylamide FloPam AN 910 SEP were used as coagulant and flocculant, respectively. Multiple water quality indicators were determined, such as turbidity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and residual aluminum concentration. Some unconventional parameters relevant for NOM removal were also considered, like absorbance at 254 nm (A254), at 280 nm (A280), and at 365 nm (A365), as well as the ratios A254/DOC, A254/280, and A254/A365. After coagulation–flocculation, turbidity was completely removed in all the studied conditions. The DOC content was reduced by up to 22.65% at a low temperature and by up to 31.81% at a high temperature. After the addition of polyelectrolyte in cold conditions, the efficiency in terms of A254 increased by up to 37.4%, while the specific absorbance decreased. The high molecular weight NOM increased after C/F, based on the A254/A365 ratio. Chemometric analysis was employed in order to determine the effect of the coagulant dose on the process efficiency. The optimum coagulation–flocculation conditions were corroborated by means of the principal component analysis. View Full-Text
Keywords: coagulation; natural organic matter; surface water; dissolved organic carbon; water quality indicators; polyhydroxy aluminum chloride coagulation; natural organic matter; surface water; dissolved organic carbon; water quality indicators; polyhydroxy aluminum chloride
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mustereț, C.P.; Morosanu, I.; Ciobanu, R.; Plavan, O.; Gherghel, A.; Al-Refai, M.; Roman, I.; Teodosiu, C. Assessment of Coagulation–Flocculation Process Efficiency for the Natural Organic Matter Removal in Drinking Water Treatment. Water 2021, 13, 3073. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213073

AMA Style

Mustereț CP, Morosanu I, Ciobanu R, Plavan O, Gherghel A, Al-Refai M, Roman I, Teodosiu C. Assessment of Coagulation–Flocculation Process Efficiency for the Natural Organic Matter Removal in Drinking Water Treatment. Water. 2021; 13(21):3073. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213073

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mustereț, Corina Petronela, Irina Morosanu, Ramona Ciobanu, Oana Plavan, Andreea Gherghel, Malek Al-Refai, Ioana Roman, and Carmen Teodosiu. 2021. "Assessment of Coagulation–Flocculation Process Efficiency for the Natural Organic Matter Removal in Drinking Water Treatment" Water 13, no. 21: 3073. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13213073

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