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Impacts of Massive Sediment Input on the Channel Geometry Adjustment of Alluvial Rivers: Revisiting the North Fork Toutle River Case

State Key Laboratory of Hydraulics & Mountain River Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, China
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Academic Editor: Achim A. Beylich
Water 2021, 13(20), 2802; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202802
Received: 13 September 2021 / Revised: 2 October 2021 / Accepted: 8 October 2021 / Published: 9 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Water Erosion and Sediment Transport)
In this study, the impacts of massive sediment input on channel geometry adjustment were analyzed across decades based on the downstream hydraulic geometry. Massive amounts of field data and evolution models showed that the alternation of degradation and aggradation in short-to-medium-term channel adjustment is common in evolving rivers. This phenomenon has always been challenging in research; most existing studies have focused on unidirectional adjustment in short-term channel adjustment. A few studies have considered the alternation of degradation and aggradation in short-to-medium-term channel adjustment, presuming that this phenomenon is caused by water and sediment changes. However, we found that the alternations also occurred under stable water and sediment transport in the North Fork Toutle River, southwestern Washington, USA. This adjustment across decades was analyzed by downstream hydraulic geometry in this study. It was concluded that the river consumes surplus energy to reach the optimal cross section through this short-to-medium-term adjustment under stable water and sediment transport. The objective of channel adjustment is minimal energy loss. View Full-Text
Keywords: sediment transport and morphology; downstream hydraulic geometry; extremal hypothesis; maximum flow efficiency; principle of minimum potential energy; short to medium term sediment transport and morphology; downstream hydraulic geometry; extremal hypothesis; maximum flow efficiency; principle of minimum potential energy; short to medium term
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wang, X.; Ma, X.; Liu, X. Impacts of Massive Sediment Input on the Channel Geometry Adjustment of Alluvial Rivers: Revisiting the North Fork Toutle River Case. Water 2021, 13, 2802. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202802

AMA Style

Wang X, Ma X, Liu X. Impacts of Massive Sediment Input on the Channel Geometry Adjustment of Alluvial Rivers: Revisiting the North Fork Toutle River Case. Water. 2021; 13(20):2802. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202802

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wang, Xiaofan, Xudong Ma, and Xingnian Liu. 2021. "Impacts of Massive Sediment Input on the Channel Geometry Adjustment of Alluvial Rivers: Revisiting the North Fork Toutle River Case" Water 13, no. 20: 2802. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202802

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