Next Article in Journal
Predicting the Existence and Prevalence of the US Water Quality Trading Markets
Next Article in Special Issue
Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of Precipitation and Potential Influencing Factors in the Loess Plateau before and after the Implementation of the Grain for Green Project
Previous Article in Journal
A Critical Review of Analytical Methods for Comprehensive Characterization of Produced Water
Previous Article in Special Issue
Review: Sources of Hydrological Model Uncertainties and Advances in Their Analysis
Article

Investigating Hydrological Variability in the Wuding River Basin: Implications for Water Resources Management under the Water–Human-Coupled Environment

1
School of Water and Environment, Chang’an University, Xi’an 710054, China
2
Key Laboratory of Subsurface Hydrology and Ecological Effect in Arid Region, Ministry of Education, Chang’an University, Xi’an 710054, China
3
Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering & Zachry Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-2117, USA
4
National Water Center, UAE University, Al Ain 17666, UAE
5
Power China Huadong Engineering Corporation Limited, Hangzhou 311122, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2021, 13(2), 184; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13020184
Received: 2 December 2020 / Revised: 9 January 2021 / Accepted: 11 January 2021 / Published: 14 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrological Modeling in Water Cycle Processes)
Understanding and quantifying changes in hydrological systems due to human interference are critical for the implementation of adaptive management of global water resources in the changing environment. To explore the implications of hydrological variations for water resources management, the Wuding River Basin (WRB) in the Loess Plateau, China, was selected as a case study. Based on the Budyko-type equation with a time-varying parameter n, a human-induced water–energy balance (HWEB) model was proposed to investigate the hydrological variability in the WRB. The investigation showed that runoff continuously reduced by 0.424 mm/a during 1975–2010, with weakly reducing precipitation and increasing groundwater exploitation causing a decrease in groundwater storage at a rate of 1.07 mm/a, and actual evapotranspiration accounting for more than 90% of precipitation having an insignificantly decreasing trend with a rate of 0.53 mm/a under climate change (decrease) and human impact (increase). Attribution analysis indicated that human-induced underlying surface condition change played a dominant role in runoff reduction by driving an increase in actual evapotranspiration, and that mainly impacted the overall decrease in runoff compounded by climate change during the entire period. It is suggested that reducing the watershed evapotranspiration and controlling groundwater exploitation should receive greater attention in future basin management. View Full-Text
Keywords: hydrological variability; climate change; human impact; attribution analysis; Budyko; Loess Plateau hydrological variability; climate change; human impact; attribution analysis; Budyko; Loess Plateau
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Dang, C.; Zhang, H.; Singh, V.P.; Yu, Y.; Shao, S. Investigating Hydrological Variability in the Wuding River Basin: Implications for Water Resources Management under the Water–Human-Coupled Environment. Water 2021, 13, 184. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13020184

AMA Style

Dang C, Zhang H, Singh VP, Yu Y, Shao S. Investigating Hydrological Variability in the Wuding River Basin: Implications for Water Resources Management under the Water–Human-Coupled Environment. Water. 2021; 13(2):184. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13020184

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dang, Chiheng; Zhang, Hongbo; Singh, Vijay P.; Yu, Yinghao; Shao, Shuting. 2021. "Investigating Hydrological Variability in the Wuding River Basin: Implications for Water Resources Management under the Water–Human-Coupled Environment" Water 13, no. 2: 184. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13020184

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop