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Urban Pluvial Flood Management Part 1: Implementing an AHP-TOPSIS Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis Method for Stakeholder Integration in Urban Climate and Stormwater Adaptation
Article

Urban Pluvial Flood Management Part 2: Global Perceptions and Priorities in Urban Stormwater Adaptation Management and Policy Alternatives

1
Department of Economics, Ca’ Foscari University of Venice, 30121 Venice, Italy
2
College of Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Vassilis Glenis and Claire Walsh
Water 2021, 13(17), 2433; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13172433
Received: 10 July 2021 / Revised: 24 August 2021 / Accepted: 1 September 2021 / Published: 4 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Blue-Green Cities for Urban Flood Resilience)
Urban stormwater infrastructure is at an increased risk of being overwhelmed by pluvial flood events due to climate change. Currently, there are no global standards or frameworks for approaching urban rainfall adaptation policy. Such standards or frameworks would allow cities that have limited time, finances or research capacities to make more confident adaptation policy decisions based on a globally agreed theoretical basis. Additionally, while adaptation via blue-green infrastructure is often weighed against traditional grey infrastructure approaches, its choice must be considered within the context of additional policy alternatives involved in stormwater management. Using six global and developed cities, we explore to what extent a standardized hierarchy of urban rainfall adaptation techniques can be established through a combined Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis. While regional and stakeholder differences emerge, our study demonstrates that green infrastructure undertaken by public bodies are the top policy alternative across the cities and stakeholder groups, and that there exists some consensus on best management practice techniques for urban stormwater adaptation. View Full-Text
Keywords: rainfall management; stormwater; urban adaptation; multi-criteria decision analysis; green infrastructure rainfall management; stormwater; urban adaptation; multi-criteria decision analysis; green infrastructure
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MDPI and ACS Style

Axelsson, C.; Giove, S.; Soriani, S.; Culligan, P.J. Urban Pluvial Flood Management Part 2: Global Perceptions and Priorities in Urban Stormwater Adaptation Management and Policy Alternatives. Water 2021, 13, 2433. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13172433

AMA Style

Axelsson C, Giove S, Soriani S, Culligan PJ. Urban Pluvial Flood Management Part 2: Global Perceptions and Priorities in Urban Stormwater Adaptation Management and Policy Alternatives. Water. 2021; 13(17):2433. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13172433

Chicago/Turabian Style

Axelsson, Charles, Silvio Giove, Stefano Soriani, and Patricia J. Culligan 2021. "Urban Pluvial Flood Management Part 2: Global Perceptions and Priorities in Urban Stormwater Adaptation Management and Policy Alternatives" Water 13, no. 17: 2433. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13172433

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