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Article

Using Constructed Floating Wetlands to Remove Nutrients from a Waste Stabilization Pond

by 1,*,†, 2,3,†, 1,† and 3,4,†
1
Unitywater, Maroochydore, QLD 4558, Australia
2
Covey Associates Pty Ltd., Maroochydore, QLD 4558, Australia
3
UniSA STEM, UniSA STEM, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
4
Department of Engineering, Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW 2795, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editor: José Miguel Sánchez Pérez
Water 2021, 13(13), 1746; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131746
Received: 24 May 2021 / Revised: 17 June 2021 / Accepted: 23 June 2021 / Published: 24 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Wastewater Treatment and Reuse)
This study reports the biomass accumulation, plant nutrient concentration, and nutrient uptake rates of plants in a constructed floating wetland (CFW) installed for a sewage treatment application in Australia. Plant biomass accumulation was estimated based on field samplings throughout the duration of the study. Analysis of samples of each plant species was also completed to estimate the mean plant tissue nutrient content. The plant biomass accumulation estimate and the mean plant tissue nutrient concentration were then used to estimate the total nutrient uptake for each species. Each of the species were found to differ in biomass accumulation and plant tissue nutrient concentration and the distribution of biomass and nutrients between the shoots and roots. The nutrient uptake rates varied between the species, with B. articulata having the greatest nutrient uptake rates (shoots: N, 104 ± 31.5 g/m2, P, 12.9 ± 3.87 g/m2; roots: N, 23.9 ± 7.23 g/m2, P, 5.54 ± 1.67 g/m2). Harvesting of the four CFW islands after 375 days of growth removed an estimated 23.2 kg of N and 2.97 kg of P. The results of this study indicate that the use of CFWs with carefully selected plant species can successfully remove significant amounts of nutrients from domestic wastewater. View Full-Text
Keywords: constructed floating wetlands; plant nutrient uptake; sewage treatment; plant harvesting constructed floating wetlands; plant nutrient uptake; sewage treatment; plant harvesting
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MDPI and ACS Style

Huth, I.; Walker, C.; Kulkarni, R.; Lucke, T. Using Constructed Floating Wetlands to Remove Nutrients from a Waste Stabilization Pond. Water 2021, 13, 1746. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131746

AMA Style

Huth I, Walker C, Kulkarni R, Lucke T. Using Constructed Floating Wetlands to Remove Nutrients from a Waste Stabilization Pond. Water. 2021; 13(13):1746. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131746

Chicago/Turabian Style

Huth, Isaac, Christopher Walker, Ramraj Kulkarni, and Terry Lucke. 2021. "Using Constructed Floating Wetlands to Remove Nutrients from a Waste Stabilization Pond" Water 13, no. 13: 1746. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131746

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