Next Article in Journal
Potential Use of Treated Wastewater as Groundwater Recharge Using GIS Techniques and Modeling Tools in Dhuleil-Halabat Well-Field/Jordan
Next Article in Special Issue
Comparison of Online Sensors for Liquid Phase Hydrogen Sulphide Monitoring in Sewer Systems
Previous Article in Journal
Evolution Pattern and Matching Mode of Precursor Information about Water Inrush in a Karst Tunnel
Previous Article in Special Issue
An Enhanced Multi-Objective Particle Swarm Optimization in Water Distribution Systems Design
Article

A Sewer Dynamic Model for Simulating Reaction Rates of Different Compounds in Urban Sewer Pipe

1
Master Program of Environmental Education and Management, Department of Science Education and Application, National Taichung University of Education, Taichung 40306, Taiwan
2
Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, Chaoyang University of Technology, Wufeng, Taichung 41349, Taiwan
3
Department of Environmental and Safety Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Mariacrocetta Sambito and Gabriele Freni
Water 2021, 13(11), 1580; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111580
Received: 7 May 2021 / Revised: 30 May 2021 / Accepted: 1 June 2021 / Published: 3 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Water Networks Modelling and Monitoring)
A sewer dynamic model (SDM), an innovative use of combined models, was established to describe the reactions of compounds in a pilot sewer pipe. The set of ordinary differential equations in the SDM was solved simultaneously using the fourth-order Runge–Kutta algorithm. The SDM was validated by calculating the consistency between the simulation and observation values. After the SDM was validated, the reaction rate was analyzed. For heterotrophs in the water phase and biofilm, their growth rates were greater than the organism decay rate. For ammonia, the supply rate was greater than the consumption rate at the initial time, but the supply rate was smaller than the consumption rate from the 3rd hour. The supply rate was smaller than the consumption rate for the other six compounds. The supply rate of oxygen was smaller than the consumption rate before the 4th hour because of the microorganism activities, and, subsequently, the supply rate was greater than the consumption rate after the 4th hour because of reaeration. The results of this study provide an insight into the reaction rates of different compounds in urban sewer pipes and an urban water network modeling reference for policymaking and regulation. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban sewer pipe; sewer dynamic model; heterotrophic biofilm; reaction rate; consumption rate urban sewer pipe; sewer dynamic model; heterotrophic biofilm; reaction rate; consumption rate
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Pai, T.-Y.; Lo, H.-M.; Wan, T.-J.; Wang, Y.-H.; Cheng, Y.-H.; Tsai, M.-H.; Tang, H.; Sun, Y.-X.; Chen, W.-C.; Lin, Y.-P. A Sewer Dynamic Model for Simulating Reaction Rates of Different Compounds in Urban Sewer Pipe. Water 2021, 13, 1580. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111580

AMA Style

Pai T-Y, Lo H-M, Wan T-J, Wang Y-H, Cheng Y-H, Tsai M-H, Tang H, Sun Y-X, Chen W-C, Lin Y-P. A Sewer Dynamic Model for Simulating Reaction Rates of Different Compounds in Urban Sewer Pipe. Water. 2021; 13(11):1580. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111580

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pai, Tzu-Yi, Huang-Mu Lo, Terng-Jou Wan, Ya-Hsuan Wang, Yun-Hsin Cheng, Meng-Hung Tsai, Hsuan Tang, Yu-Xiang Sun, Wei-Cheng Chen, and Yi-Ping Lin. 2021. "A Sewer Dynamic Model for Simulating Reaction Rates of Different Compounds in Urban Sewer Pipe" Water 13, no. 11: 1580. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111580

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop