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Article

Biological Early Warning Systems: The Experience in the Gran Sasso-Sirente Aquifer

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Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale dell’Abruzzo e del Molise “G. Caporale” (IZSAM), 64100 Teramo, Italy
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Officine Inovo, Engineering & Design Studio, 64100 Teramo, Italy
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Agenzia Regionale Protezione Ambiente del Lazio—ARPA Lazio, 00187 Rome, Italy
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CETEMPS, Centre of Excellence—University of L’Aquila, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
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Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L’Aquila, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
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Ruzzo Reti Spa, 64100 Teramo, Italy
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Consorzio di Bonifica Interno “Bacino Aterno e Sagittario”, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
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World Organization for Animal Health—OIE, 75017 Paris, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Nikolaos Skoulikidis
Water 2021, 13(11), 1529; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111529
Received: 30 April 2021 / Accepted: 27 May 2021 / Published: 29 May 2021
Biological early warning systems (BEWS) are installed worldwide for the continuous control of water intended for multiple uses. Sentinel aquatic organisms can alert us to contaminant presence through their physiological or behavioural alterations. The present study is aimed at sharing the experience acquired with water biomonitoring of the Gran Sasso-Sirente (GS-S) aquifer. It represents the major source of the Abruzzi region surface water, also intended as drinkable and for irrigation use. Besides the biomonitoring of drinkable water of the Teramo Province made by Daphnia Toximeter and irrigation water of the L’Aquila Province by Algae Toximeter, a novel sensor named “SmartShell” has been developed to register the behaviour of the “pea clam” P. casertanum, an autochthonous small bivalve living in the Nature 2000 site “Tirino River spring”. The valve movements have been recorded directly on the field. Its behavioural rhythms have been analysed through spectral analyses, providing the basis for further investigations on their alterations as early warnings and allowing us to propose this autochthonous bivalve species as a novel sentinel organism for spring water. View Full-Text
Keywords: biological early warning system; Gran Sasso-Sirente aquifer; valvometry; behaviour; Pisidium casertanum biological early warning system; Gran Sasso-Sirente aquifer; valvometry; behaviour; Pisidium casertanum
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MDPI and ACS Style

Di Giacinto, F.; Berti, M.; Carbone, L.; Caprioli, R.; Colaiuda, V.; Lombardi, A.; Tomassetti, B.; Tuccella, P.; De Iuliis, G.; Pietroleonardo, A.; Latini, M.; Mascilongo, G.; Di Renzo, L.; D’Alterio, N.; Ferri, N. Biological Early Warning Systems: The Experience in the Gran Sasso-Sirente Aquifer. Water 2021, 13, 1529. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111529

AMA Style

Di Giacinto F, Berti M, Carbone L, Caprioli R, Colaiuda V, Lombardi A, Tomassetti B, Tuccella P, De Iuliis G, Pietroleonardo A, Latini M, Mascilongo G, Di Renzo L, D’Alterio N, Ferri N. Biological Early Warning Systems: The Experience in the Gran Sasso-Sirente Aquifer. Water. 2021; 13(11):1529. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111529

Chicago/Turabian Style

Di Giacinto, Federica, Miriam Berti, Luigi Carbone, Riccardo Caprioli, Valentina Colaiuda, Annalina Lombardi, Barbara Tomassetti, Paolo Tuccella, Gianpaolo De Iuliis, Adelina Pietroleonardo, Mario Latini, Giuseppina Mascilongo, Ludovica Di Renzo, Nicola D’Alterio, and Nicola Ferri. 2021. "Biological Early Warning Systems: The Experience in the Gran Sasso-Sirente Aquifer" Water 13, no. 11: 1529. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111529

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