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Allotments in the Future: Building Resilience to Climate Change through Improved Site Design and Efficient Water Practices

Department of Geography and Environmental Management, University of the West of England, Bristol BS16 1QY, UK
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Academic Editor: Fernando António Leal Pacheco
Water 2021, 13(11), 1457; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111457
Received: 11 April 2021 / Revised: 18 May 2021 / Accepted: 19 May 2021 / Published: 22 May 2021
In recent years, there has been a resurgence in the popularity of allotments and home- grown food in the UK. This interest is likely to increase as people become more aware of the health benefits of spending time outdoors. Climate projections for the UK indicate that over the next 20 years, winters will become warmer and wetter, and the summers hotter and drier. Most UK allotments and community gardens are a collection of individual plots whose holders are free to manage them as they wish, within site rules. The efficacy of individual efforts to collect and store rainwater is often limited as most allotment sites were laid out when water practices were a secondary consideration. Our research, which included visiting allotment sites and reviewing growing practices, suggests that grouping plots and sharing water facilities could enable plot holders to store sufficient water to meet anticipated demand for thirty rain-free days in midsummer. This combined with growing practices that improve soil moisture capacity and water use efficiency will provide effective mitigation against climate change. View Full-Text
Keywords: allotment; climate change; sustainability; water efficiency; water harvesting; water storage allotment; climate change; sustainability; water efficiency; water harvesting; water storage
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ayling, S.M.; Phillips, N.; Bunney, S. Allotments in the Future: Building Resilience to Climate Change through Improved Site Design and Efficient Water Practices. Water 2021, 13, 1457. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111457

AMA Style

Ayling SM, Phillips N, Bunney S. Allotments in the Future: Building Resilience to Climate Change through Improved Site Design and Efficient Water Practices. Water. 2021; 13(11):1457. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111457

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ayling, Sarah M., Neil Phillips, and Sarah Bunney. 2021. "Allotments in the Future: Building Resilience to Climate Change through Improved Site Design and Efficient Water Practices" Water 13, no. 11: 1457. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13111457

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