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Article

Adsorption by Granular Activated Carbon and Nano Zerovalent Iron from Wastewater: A Study on Removal of Selenomethionine and Selenocysteine

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Department of Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, ICT 402, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
2
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Calgary, ENF 262, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
3
Stantec, 200-325 25 Street SE, Calgary, AB T2A 7H8, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2021, 13(1), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13010023
Received: 26 November 2020 / Revised: 21 December 2020 / Accepted: 22 December 2020 / Published: 25 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adsorbents for Water and Wastewater Treatment and Resource Recovery)
Selenomethionine (SeMet) and selenocysteine (SeCys) are the most common forms of organic selenium, which is often found in the effluent of industrial wastewater. These organic selenium compounds are toxic, bioavailable and most likely to bioaccumulate in aquatic organisms. This study investigated the use of two adsorbent candidates (granular activated carbon (GAC) and nano zerovalent iron (nZVI)) as treatment technologies for SeMet and SeCys removal. Batch experiments were performed and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) was used for sample analysis. Experimental data showed GAC demonstrated a higher affinity towards the removal of SeMet and SeCys compared to nZVI. The removal efficiency of SeCys and SeMet by GAC was 96.1% and 86.7%, respectively. NZVI adsorption capacity for SeCys was 39.4% and SeMet < 1.1%. Irrespective of the adsorbent, SeMet is more refractory to be adsorbed compared to SeCys. Kinetics data of GAC and nZVI agreed well with the pseudo-second-order model (R2 > 0.990). The experimental data of SeCys was characterized by Langmuir model, indicating monolayer adsorption. The adsorption capacity of nZVI for SeCys increased significantly by about 35%, with a decrease in pH from 9.0 to 4.0, indicating that SeCy removal by nZVI is pH dependent. While electrostatic attraction is considered the driving mechanism for nZVI adsorption, GAC uptake capacity is controlled by weak van der Waal forces. The adsorption of binary adsorbates (SeMet and SeCys) exhibited an inhibitory effect due to the competitive interaction between contaminant molecules. View Full-Text
Keywords: adsorption; nano zerovalent iron; granular activated carbon; organoselenium; water; wastewater; treatment adsorption; nano zerovalent iron; granular activated carbon; organoselenium; water; wastewater; treatment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Okonji, S.O.; Yu, L.; Dominic, J.A.; Pernitsky, D.; Achari, G. Adsorption by Granular Activated Carbon and Nano Zerovalent Iron from Wastewater: A Study on Removal of Selenomethionine and Selenocysteine. Water 2021, 13, 23. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13010023

AMA Style

Okonji SO, Yu L, Dominic JA, Pernitsky D, Achari G. Adsorption by Granular Activated Carbon and Nano Zerovalent Iron from Wastewater: A Study on Removal of Selenomethionine and Selenocysteine. Water. 2021; 13(1):23. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13010023

Chicago/Turabian Style

Okonji, Stanley O., Linlong Yu, John A. Dominic, David Pernitsky, and Gopal Achari. 2021. "Adsorption by Granular Activated Carbon and Nano Zerovalent Iron from Wastewater: A Study on Removal of Selenomethionine and Selenocysteine" Water 13, no. 1: 23. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13010023

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