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Article

Experimental Study at the Reservoir Head of Run-of-River Hydropower Plants in Gravel Bed Rivers. Part I: Delta Formation at Operation Level

CD-Laboratory for Sediment research and management, Institute for Hydraulic Engineering and River Research, Department for Water-Atmosphere-Environment, BOKU-University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Muthgasse 18, 1190 Vienna, Austria
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Water 2020, 12(7), 2035; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12072035
Received: 29 May 2020 / Revised: 6 July 2020 / Accepted: 15 July 2020 / Published: 17 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sediment Management: Hydropower Improvement and Habitat Evaluation)
This study concerns scaled physical model tests of the delta formation process at the head of a run-of-river hydropower plant (RoR). It forms part of a larger research project to provide a scientific base for RoR sediment management strategies in medium-sized gravel bed rivers. The physical model consisted of an idealized river having a width of 20 m, a mean slope of 0.005, a mean flow rate of 22 m3/s and a 1-year flood flow of 104 m3/s. The model scale was 1:20. For the experiments, five different grain sizes were used, covering a range of 14 to 120 mm at 1:1 scale. Experiments were carried out under mobile-bed conditions at flow rates which correspond to 50%–80% of a 1-year flood HQ1. Even at the head of the reservoir, which is least influenced by the backwater effect of the RoR, sediment transport practically ceases for sediment fractions >14 mm for a flow rate of 0.7 × HQ1. The whole sediment load coming from the undisturbed upstream section accumulates at the head of the reservoir. This delta formation is accompanied by a substantial rise in water levels. A spatio-temporal scheme of the delta formation was derived from the experiments. The study proved that the delta formation increases the flood risk at the head of the reservoir. Conversely, reservoir drawdowns at flood events of high probability may be a promising strategy to enhance sediment connectivity under the specified boundary conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: sediment management strategies; run-of-river hydropower plants; sediment mixtures; delta formation; sediment continuity sediment management strategies; run-of-river hydropower plants; sediment mixtures; delta formation; sediment continuity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sindelar, C.; Gold, T.; Reiterer, K.; Hauer, C.; Habersack, H. Experimental Study at the Reservoir Head of Run-of-River Hydropower Plants in Gravel Bed Rivers. Part I: Delta Formation at Operation Level. Water 2020, 12, 2035. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12072035

AMA Style

Sindelar C, Gold T, Reiterer K, Hauer C, Habersack H. Experimental Study at the Reservoir Head of Run-of-River Hydropower Plants in Gravel Bed Rivers. Part I: Delta Formation at Operation Level. Water. 2020; 12(7):2035. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12072035

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sindelar, Christine, Thomas Gold, Kevin Reiterer, Christoph Hauer, and Helmut Habersack. 2020. "Experimental Study at the Reservoir Head of Run-of-River Hydropower Plants in Gravel Bed Rivers. Part I: Delta Formation at Operation Level" Water 12, no. 7: 2035. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12072035

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