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Article

Governing Urban Water Conflict through Watershed Councils—A Public Policy Analysis Approach and Critique

Public Administration Division, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (CIDE), Sede Región Centro, Aguascalientes 20313, Mexico
Water 2020, 12(7), 1849; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12071849
Received: 1 May 2020 / Revised: 19 June 2020 / Accepted: 25 June 2020 / Published: 28 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Public Policy Analysis of Integrated Water Resource Management)
Cities face substantial water governance challenges, even more so when their activities are water-intensive, as global tourism is. As the lower-most level of government, municipalities face important challenges when dealing with water stress. Designing robust urban water policy thus may require us to challenge currently popular modes of governance by river basin councils, as predicated by the integrated water resources management (IWRM) paradigm. In this paper, I conduct a public policy analysis of a case study of intra-urban water conflict in the Mexican city of San Miguel de Allende (SMA), an extremely popular tourist destination with substantive water scarcity challenges. I draw insights from an application of the Institutional Grammar Tool, IGT (as proposed by Ostrom and Crawford) on a series of textual datasets derived from ethnographic, qualitative longitudinal field research, document analysis, and elite interviews with stakeholders to explain the reasons underlying community concerns about urban water supply which have derived in conflict in San Miguel de Allende and increasingly manifested over the past few years (2017–2020). My analysis suggests that to tackle growing intra-urban antagonism derived from increasing water insecurity in San Miguel de Allende, a more localized, micro-watershed approach might be more fruitful than a traditional river basin council strategy. View Full-Text
Keywords: river basin council; watershed; water governance; policy analysis; water policy; integrated water resources management; urban water; polycentricity; intractable water conflict; San Miguel de Allende river basin council; watershed; water governance; policy analysis; water policy; integrated water resources management; urban water; polycentricity; intractable water conflict; San Miguel de Allende
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pacheco-Vega, R. Governing Urban Water Conflict through Watershed Councils—A Public Policy Analysis Approach and Critique. Water 2020, 12, 1849. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12071849

AMA Style

Pacheco-Vega R. Governing Urban Water Conflict through Watershed Councils—A Public Policy Analysis Approach and Critique. Water. 2020; 12(7):1849. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12071849

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pacheco-Vega, Raul. 2020. "Governing Urban Water Conflict through Watershed Councils—A Public Policy Analysis Approach and Critique" Water 12, no. 7: 1849. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12071849

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