Next Article in Journal
A Coupled Hydrologic–Hydraulic Model (XAJ–HiPIMS) for Flood Simulation
Previous Article in Journal
Evaluation of Snowmelt Estimation Techniques for Enhanced Spring Peak Flow Prediction
Article

Evaluation of an Inexpensive Handwashing and Water Treatment Program in Rural Health Care Facilities in Three Districts in Tanzania, 2017

1
Waterborne Diseases Prevention Branch, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA
2
Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly, and Children, 40478 Dodoma, Tanzania
3
PATH Tanzania, Dar es Salaam P.O. Box 13600, Tanzania
4
PATH, Seattle, WA 98109, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(5), 1289; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051289
Received: 15 April 2020 / Revised: 27 April 2020 / Accepted: 28 April 2020 / Published: 1 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Water Quality and Contamination)
Unsafe water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) conditions in healthcare facilities (HCFs) can increase the risk of disease transmission, yet WASH coverage is inadequate in HCFs in most low- and middle-income countries. In September 2017, we conducted a baseline survey of WASH coverage in 100 HCFs in three rural Tanzanian districts. Based on needs calculated from the baseline, we distributed handwashing and drinking water stations, soap, and chlorine solution; we repeated the survey 10 months later. The intervention improved coverage with handwashing stations (82% vs. 100%, p < 0.0001), handwashing stations with water (59% vs. 96%, p < 0.0001), handwashing stations with soap and water (19% vs. 46%, p < 0.0001), and handwashing stations with soap and water within 5 m of latrines (26% vs. 53%, p < 0.0001). Coverage of drinking water stations increased from 34% to 100% (p < 0.0001) HCFs with at least one drinking water station with free chlorine residual (FCR) > 0.2mg/ml increased from 6% to 36% (p < 0.0001), and in a sample of HCFs, detectable E. coli in stored drinking water samples decreased from 46% to 5% (p < 0.001). Although the program increased access to handwashing stations, drinking water stations, and safe drinking water in HCFs in rural Tanzania, modest increases in soap availability and water treatment highlighted persistent challenges. View Full-Text
Keywords: handwashing; health facilities; hygiene; rural; Tanzania handwashing; health facilities; hygiene; rural; Tanzania
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Davis, W.; Massa, K.; Kiberiti, S.; Mnzava, H.; Venczel, L.; Quick, R. Evaluation of an Inexpensive Handwashing and Water Treatment Program in Rural Health Care Facilities in Three Districts in Tanzania, 2017. Water 2020, 12, 1289. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051289

AMA Style

Davis W, Massa K, Kiberiti S, Mnzava H, Venczel L, Quick R. Evaluation of an Inexpensive Handwashing and Water Treatment Program in Rural Health Care Facilities in Three Districts in Tanzania, 2017. Water. 2020; 12(5):1289. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051289

Chicago/Turabian Style

Davis, William, Khalid Massa, Stephen Kiberiti, Hosea Mnzava, Linda Venczel, and Robert Quick. 2020. "Evaluation of an Inexpensive Handwashing and Water Treatment Program in Rural Health Care Facilities in Three Districts in Tanzania, 2017" Water 12, no. 5: 1289. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12051289

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop