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Correction: Castellini, M., et al. Spatial Variability of Soil Physical and Hydraulic Properties in a Durum Wheat Field: An Assessment by the BEST-Procedure. Water 2019, 11, 1434
Editorial

Soil Hydrology for a Sustainable Land Management: Theory and Practice

1
Agricultural Department, University of Sassari, Viale Italia, 39, 07100 Sassari, Italy
2
Université de Lyon, UMR5023 Ecologie des Hydrosystèmes Naturels et Anthropisés, CNRS, ENTPE, Université Lyon 1, 3 rue Maurice Audin, 69518 Vaulx-en-Velin, France
3
Council for Agricultural Research and Economics–Research Center for Agriculture and Environment (CREA–AA) Via C. Ulpiani, 570125 Bari, Italy
4
Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Group, Department of Geography, University of Valencia, 46010 Valencia, Spain
5
Physical Geography, Trier University, 54286 Trier, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(4), 1109; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041109
Received: 27 March 2020 / Accepted: 9 April 2020 / Published: 13 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Hydrology for a Sustainable Land Management: Theory and Practice)
Soil hydrology determines the water–soil–plant interactions in the Earth’s system, because porous medium acts as an interface within the atmosphere and lithosphere, regulates main processes such as runoff discharge, aquifer recharge, movement of water and solutes into the soil and, ultimately, the amount of water retained and available for plants growth. Soil hydrology can be strongly affected by land management. Therefore, investigations aimed at assessing the impact of land management changes on soil hydrology are necessary, especially with a view to optimize water resources. This Special Issue collects 12 original contributions addressing the state of the art of soil hydrology for sustainable land management. These contributions cover a wide range of topics including (i) effects of land-use change, (ii) water use efficiency, (iii) erosion risk, (iv) solute transport, and (v) new methods and devices for improved characterization of soil physical and hydraulic properties. They involve both field and laboratory experiments, as well as modelling studies. Also, different spatial scales, i.e., from the field- to regional-scales, as well as a wide range of geographic regions are also covered. The collection of these manuscripts presented in this Special Issue provides a relevant knowledge contribution for effective saving water resources and sustainable land management. View Full-Text
Keywords: soil hydrology; sustainable land management; soil water content; water fluxes; soil erosion; runoff; spatial variability; BEST-procedure; Hydrus-1D; Arduino soil hydrology; sustainable land management; soil water content; water fluxes; soil erosion; runoff; spatial variability; BEST-procedure; Hydrus-1D; Arduino
MDPI and ACS Style

Di Prima, S.; Castellini, M.; Rodrigo-Comino, J.; Cerdà, A. Soil Hydrology for a Sustainable Land Management: Theory and Practice. Water 2020, 12, 1109. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041109

AMA Style

Di Prima S, Castellini M, Rodrigo-Comino J, Cerdà A. Soil Hydrology for a Sustainable Land Management: Theory and Practice. Water. 2020; 12(4):1109. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041109

Chicago/Turabian Style

Di Prima, Simone; Castellini, Mirko; Rodrigo-Comino, Jesús; Cerdà, Artemi. 2020. "Soil Hydrology for a Sustainable Land Management: Theory and Practice" Water 12, no. 4: 1109. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041109

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