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Open AccessArticle

Short-Term Effects of Salt Stress on the Amino Acids of Phragmites australis Root Exudates in Constructed Wetlands

1
College of Water Resources and Civil Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
2
College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
3
Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(2), 569; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12020569
Received: 15 January 2020 / Revised: 15 February 2020 / Accepted: 16 February 2020 / Published: 19 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Pollution Control Using Eco-treatment Systems)
In this study, the short-term effects of NaCl stress on the free amino acid content and composition of root exudates of Phragmites australis were evaluated. Nineteen amino acid types were detected in all samples. The results indicated that NaCl significantly influenced the total amino acid (TotAA) content. The TotAA content at 6‰ salinity (1098.79 μM g−1 DW) was up to 24 times higher than that in the control group (45.97 μM g−1 DW) but decreased to 106.32 μM g−1 DW at 6‰ salinity in the first hour. The stress period also significantly affected the TotAA content. After 4 h of stress, the TotAA content of the control and 1‰ salinity groups increased by approximately 30- and 14-fold, and those of the 3‰ and 6‰ groups decreased to 60% and 37%, respectively. The increase in TotAA content was primarily caused by the increase in proline content; the proportion of proline accounted for 58.05% of the TotAA content at 3‰ salinity level in 2 h. Most amino acids showed a significant positive correlation with each other, but proline and methionine showed a different trend. Therefore, the proline level is a useful indicator of salt stress in Phragmites australis, especially in saltwater wetlands. View Full-Text
Keywords: Phragmites australis; salt stress; root exudates; amino acids; proline Phragmites australis; salt stress; root exudates; amino acids; proline
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Xie, E.; Wei, X.; Ding, A.; Zheng, L.; Wu, X.; Anderson, B. Short-Term Effects of Salt Stress on the Amino Acids of Phragmites australis Root Exudates in Constructed Wetlands. Water 2020, 12, 569.

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