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Article

Removal of Diclofenac in Wastewater Using Biosorption and Advanced Oxidation Techniques: Comparative Results

Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Cartagena, Paseo Alfonso XIII, 52, 30203 Cartagena, Murcia, Spain
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Water 2020, 12(12), 3567; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123567
Received: 25 November 2020 / Revised: 16 December 2020 / Accepted: 17 December 2020 / Published: 19 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Adsorbents for Water and Wastewater Treatment and Resource Recovery)
Wastewater treatment is a topic of primary interest with regard to the environment. Diclofenac is a common analgesic drug often detected in wastewater and surface water. In this paper, three commonly available agrifood waste types (artichoke agrowaste, olive-mill residues, and citrus waste) were reused as sorbents of diclofenac present in aqueous effluents. Citrus-waste biomass for a dose of 2 g·L−1 allowed for removing 99.7% of diclofenac present in the initial sample, with a sorption capacity of 9 mg of adsorbed diclofenac for each gram of used biomass. The respective values obtained for olive-mill residues and artichoke agrowaste were around 4.15 mg·g−1. Advanced oxidation processes with UV/H2O2 and UV/HOCl were shown to be effective treatments for the elimination of diclofenac. A significant reduction in chemical oxygen demand (COD; 40–48%) was also achieved with these oxidation treatments. Despite the lesser effectiveness of the sorption process, it should be considered that the reuse and valorization of these lignocellulosic agrifood residues would facilitate the fostering of a circular economy. View Full-Text
Keywords: agrowaste biomass; biosorption; diclofenac removal; advanced oxidation treatments; low-cost sorbents agrowaste biomass; biosorption; diclofenac removal; advanced oxidation treatments; low-cost sorbents
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MDPI and ACS Style

Angosto, J.M.; Roca, M.J.; Fernández-López, J.A. Removal of Diclofenac in Wastewater Using Biosorption and Advanced Oxidation Techniques: Comparative Results. Water 2020, 12, 3567. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123567

AMA Style

Angosto JM, Roca MJ, Fernández-López JA. Removal of Diclofenac in Wastewater Using Biosorption and Advanced Oxidation Techniques: Comparative Results. Water. 2020; 12(12):3567. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123567

Chicago/Turabian Style

Angosto, José M.; Roca, María J.; Fernández-López, José A. 2020. "Removal of Diclofenac in Wastewater Using Biosorption and Advanced Oxidation Techniques: Comparative Results" Water 12, no. 12: 3567. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123567

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