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Article

Groundwater Isotopes in the Sonoyta River Watershed, USA-Mexico: Implications for Recharge Sources and Management of the Quitobaquito Springs

1
Department of Geosciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
2
Desert Laboratory on Tumamoc Hill, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85745, USA
3
Department of Hydrology and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
This author is retired.
Water 2020, 12(12), 3307; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123307
Received: 30 September 2020 / Revised: 18 November 2020 / Accepted: 20 November 2020 / Published: 24 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geochemistry of Groundwater)
Groundwater resources in the southwestern United States are finite and riparian and wetland areas are vulnerable to aquifer overdraft and unregulated groundwater use. Environmental isotopes and water chemistry were used to distinguish water types, recharge mechanisms, and residence time along several reaches of the Sonoyta River and Quitobaquito Springs located near the U.S.-Mexico border. Areas located upgradient from the Sonoyta River, such as the Puerto Blanco Mountains and La Abra Plain, are supported by local recharge which corresponds to water from the largest 30% of rain events mainly occurring during winter. For Quitobaquito Springs, the δ18O and δ2H values are too low to be derived from local recharge. Stable isotope data and Cl/SO4 mass ratios indicate that the Sonoyta River supplied Quitobaquito Springs through flow along a suggested fault system. Based on these results, Quitobaquito Springs flow could be diminished by any activity resulting in increased groundwater extraction and lowering of water elevations in the Sonoyta River regional aquifer. View Full-Text
Keywords: groundwater; springs; environmental isotopes; transboundary watershed; Sonoyta River groundwater; springs; environmental isotopes; transboundary watershed; Sonoyta River
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zamora, H.A.; Eastoe, C.J.; Wilder, B.T.; McIntosh, J.C.; Meixner, T.; Flessa, K.W. Groundwater Isotopes in the Sonoyta River Watershed, USA-Mexico: Implications for Recharge Sources and Management of the Quitobaquito Springs. Water 2020, 12, 3307. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123307

AMA Style

Zamora HA, Eastoe CJ, Wilder BT, McIntosh JC, Meixner T, Flessa KW. Groundwater Isotopes in the Sonoyta River Watershed, USA-Mexico: Implications for Recharge Sources and Management of the Quitobaquito Springs. Water. 2020; 12(12):3307. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123307

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zamora, Hector A.; Eastoe, Christopher J.; Wilder, Benjamin T.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Meixner, Thomas; Flessa, Karl W. 2020. "Groundwater Isotopes in the Sonoyta River Watershed, USA-Mexico: Implications for Recharge Sources and Management of the Quitobaquito Springs" Water 12, no. 12: 3307. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12123307

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