Next Article in Journal
Are the Fouta Djallon Highlands Still the Water Tower of West Africa?
Next Article in Special Issue
Application of Stable Isotopes and Tritium in Hydrology
Previous Article in Journal
AIN-Based MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) Hydrophone Sensors for IoT Water Leakage Detection System
Previous Article in Special Issue
Isotope Composition of Precipitation, Groundwater, and Surface and Lake Waters from the Plitvice Lakes, Croatia
Article

Using High-Frequency Water Vapor Isotopic Measurements as a Novel Method to Partition Daily Evapotranspiration in an Oak Woodland

1
Department of Ecology and Conservation Biology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
2
Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Vernon, TX 76384, USA
3
National Ecological Observatory Network, Denton, TX 76205, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(11), 2967; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12112967
Received: 27 July 2020 / Revised: 17 October 2020 / Accepted: 19 October 2020 / Published: 22 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Stable Isotopes and Tritium in Hydrology)
Partitioning evapotranspiration (ET) into its constituent fluxes (transpiration (T) and evaporation (E)) is important for understanding water use efficiency in forests and other ecosystems. Recent advancements in cavity ringdown spectrometers (CRDS) have made collecting high-resolution water isotope data possible in remote locations, but this technology has rarely been utilized for partitioning ET in forests and other natural systems. To understand how the CRDS can be integrated with more traditional techniques, we combined stable isotope, eddy covariance, and sap flux techniques to partition ET in an oak woodland using continuous water vapor CRDS measurements and monthly soil and twig samples processed using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Furthermore, we wanted to compare the efficacy of δ2H versus δ18O within the stable isotope method for partitioning ET. We determined that average daytime vapor pressure deficit and soil moisture could successfully predict the relative isotopic compositions of soil (δe) and xylem (δt) water, respectively. Contrary to past studies, δ2H and δ18O performed similarly, indicating CRDS can increase the utility of δ18O in stable isotope studies. However, we found a 41–49% overestimation of the contribution of T to ET (fT) when utilizing the stable isotope technique compared to traditional techniques (reduced to 4–12% when corrected for bias), suggesting there may be a systematic bias to the Craig-Gordon Model in natural systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: water stable isotopes; ecohydrology; evapotranspiration; eddy covariance; forest hydrology; National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) water stable isotopes; ecohydrology; evapotranspiration; eddy covariance; forest hydrology; National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON)
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Adkison, C.; Cooper-Norris, C.; Patankar, R.; Moore, G.W. Using High-Frequency Water Vapor Isotopic Measurements as a Novel Method to Partition Daily Evapotranspiration in an Oak Woodland. Water 2020, 12, 2967. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12112967

AMA Style

Adkison C, Cooper-Norris C, Patankar R, Moore GW. Using High-Frequency Water Vapor Isotopic Measurements as a Novel Method to Partition Daily Evapotranspiration in an Oak Woodland. Water. 2020; 12(11):2967. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12112967

Chicago/Turabian Style

Adkison, Christopher; Cooper-Norris, Caitlyn; Patankar, Rajit; Moore, Georgianne W. 2020. "Using High-Frequency Water Vapor Isotopic Measurements as a Novel Method to Partition Daily Evapotranspiration in an Oak Woodland" Water 12, no. 11: 2967. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12112967

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop