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Article

From Highs to Lows: Changes in Dissolved Organic Carbon in a Peatland Catchment and Lake Following Extreme Flow Events

1
Centre for Freshwater and Environmental Studies, Dundalk Institute of Technology, A91 K584 Dundalk, Ireland
2
Newport Research Facility, Fisheries & Ecosystem Advisory Services, Marine Institute, Newport, F28 PF65 Co. Mayo, Ireland
3
Centre for the Environment, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland
4
Lakeland Instrumentation Ltd., Grange-Over-Sands LA11 7HA, UK
5
Department of Ecology and Genetics—Limnology, Uppsala University, 75236 Uppsala, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(10), 2843; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102843
Received: 15 August 2020 / Revised: 22 September 2020 / Accepted: 8 October 2020 / Published: 13 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Extreme Climate Events on Lake Ecosystems)
The concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in freshwater catchments has implications for carbon availability in downstream lakes and for water supplies. The links between catchment hydrology and stream and lake DOC concentrations are, however, still not fully understood. Much of the literature has been from catchments with organo-mineral soils, with fewer studies from upland peat sites. We used high-frequency fluorescence data, a proxy for DOC, to investigate 1. the relationship between stream discharge and concentration in a blanket peat catchment during extreme high flows and 2. the relationship between inflow and in-lake estimated DOC concentrations. We found that for approximately two thirds of extreme events, there was a decrease in stream DOC concentration (i.e., a dilution) on the rising limb rather than an increase (i.e., a flushing out of DOC from terrestrial stores). Flushing events dominated only in summer when concentrations in the stream were also increasing. In comparison to the stream, concentrations in the downstream lake were less variable, and peaks and troughs were damped and lagged. Replicating these patterns and processes in DOC models would be critical in order to provide appropriate simulations in response to shorter- and longer-term changes in climate, and thus inform future catchment and lake management. View Full-Text
Keywords: blanket peat; humic lakes; dissolved organic carbon; discharge–concentration relationships; extreme events blanket peat; humic lakes; dissolved organic carbon; discharge–concentration relationships; extreme events
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jennings, E.; de Eyto, E.; Moore, T.; Dillane, M.; Ryder, E.; Allott, N.; Nic Aonghusa, C.; Rouen, M.; Poole, R.; Pierson, D.C. From Highs to Lows: Changes in Dissolved Organic Carbon in a Peatland Catchment and Lake Following Extreme Flow Events. Water 2020, 12, 2843. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102843

AMA Style

Jennings E, de Eyto E, Moore T, Dillane M, Ryder E, Allott N, Nic Aonghusa C, Rouen M, Poole R, Pierson DC. From Highs to Lows: Changes in Dissolved Organic Carbon in a Peatland Catchment and Lake Following Extreme Flow Events. Water. 2020; 12(10):2843. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102843

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jennings, Eleanor, Elvira de Eyto, Tadhg Moore, Mary Dillane, Elizabeth Ryder, Norman Allott, Caitriona Nic Aonghusa, Martin Rouen, Russell Poole, and Donald C. Pierson 2020. "From Highs to Lows: Changes in Dissolved Organic Carbon in a Peatland Catchment and Lake Following Extreme Flow Events" Water 12, no. 10: 2843. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12102843

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